Do Patient-Centered Medical Homes Improve Health Behaviors, Outcomes, and Experiences of Low-Income Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Carissa van den Berk-Clark, Emily Doucette, Fred Rottnek, William Manard, Mayra Aragon Prada, Rachel Hughes, Tyler Lawrence, F. David Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine: (1) what elements of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are typically provided to low-income populations, (2) whether PCMHs improve health behaviors, experiences, and outcomes for low-income groups. Data Sources/Study Setting: Existing literature on PCMH utilization among health care organizations serving low-income populations. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data Collection/Extraction Methods: We obtained papers through existing systematic and literature reviews and via PubMed, Web of Science, and the TRIP databases, which examined PCMHs serving low-income populations. A total of 434 studies were reviewed. Thirty-three articles met eligibility criteria. Principal Findings: Patient-centered medical home interventions usually were composed of five of the six recommended components. Overall positive effect of PCMH interventions was d = 0.247 (range -0.965 to 1.42). PCMH patients had better clinical outcomes (d = 0.395), higher adherence (0.392), and lower utilization of emergency rooms (d = -0.248), but there were apparent limitations in study quality. Conclusions: Evidence shows that the PCMH model can increase health outcomes among low-income populations. However, limitations to quality include no assessment for confounding variables. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Services Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Patient-Centered Care
Health Behavior
Meta-Analysis
Poverty
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Information Storage and Retrieval
PubMed
Hospital Emergency Service
Organizations
Databases

Keywords

  • Implementation
  • Patient-centered medical home
  • Poverty
  • Underserved patients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Do Patient-Centered Medical Homes Improve Health Behaviors, Outcomes, and Experiences of Low-Income Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. / van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Doucette, Emily; Rottnek, Fred; Manard, William; Prada, Mayra Aragon; Hughes, Rachel; Lawrence, Tyler; Schneider, F. David.

In: Health Services Research, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van den Berk-Clark, Carissa ; Doucette, Emily ; Rottnek, Fred ; Manard, William ; Prada, Mayra Aragon ; Hughes, Rachel ; Lawrence, Tyler ; Schneider, F. David. / Do Patient-Centered Medical Homes Improve Health Behaviors, Outcomes, and Experiences of Low-Income Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. In: Health Services Research. 2017.
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