Does anodyne light therapy improve peripheral neuropathy in diabetes? A double-blind, sham-controlled, randomized trial to evaluate monochromatic infrared photoenergy

Lawrence A. Lavery, Douglas P. Murdoch, Jayme Williams, David C. Lavery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of anodyne monochromatic infrared photo energy (MIRE) in-home treatments over a 90-day period to improve peripheral sensation and self-reported quality of life in individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trail. We randomly assigned 69 individuals with diabetes and a vibration perception threshold (VPT) between 20 and 45 V to two treatment groups: active or sham treatment. Sixty patients (120 limbs) completed the study. Anodyne units were used at home every day for 40 min for 90 days. We evaluated nerve conduction velocities, VPT, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments (SWM) (4-, 10-, 26-, and 60-g monofilaments), the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI), a 10-cm visual analog pain scale, and a neuropathyspecific quality of life instrument. We used a nested repeated-measures multiple ANOVA design. Two sites (great toe and fifth metatarsal) were tested on both the left and right feet of each patient, so two feet were nested within each patient and two sites were nested within each foot. To analyze the ordinal SWM scores, we used a nonparametric factorial analysis for longitudinal data. RESULTS - There were no significant differences in measures for quality of life, MNSI, VPT, SWM, or nerve conduction velocities in active or sham treatment groups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS - Anodyne MIRE therapy was no more effective than sham therapy in the treatment of sensory neuropathy in individuals with diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-321
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Fingerprint

Phototherapy
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Analgesics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Vibration
Neural Conduction
Quality of Life
Foot
Placebos
Hallux
Therapeutics
Metatarsal Bones
Pain Measurement
Analysis of Variance
Research Design
Extremities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Does anodyne light therapy improve peripheral neuropathy in diabetes? A double-blind, sham-controlled, randomized trial to evaluate monochromatic infrared photoenergy. / Lavery, Lawrence A.; Murdoch, Douglas P.; Williams, Jayme; Lavery, David C.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 31, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 316-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d51351e55c574f6cbc754e666c574e1f,
title = "Does anodyne light therapy improve peripheral neuropathy in diabetes? A double-blind, sham-controlled, randomized trial to evaluate monochromatic infrared photoenergy",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of anodyne monochromatic infrared photo energy (MIRE) in-home treatments over a 90-day period to improve peripheral sensation and self-reported quality of life in individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trail. We randomly assigned 69 individuals with diabetes and a vibration perception threshold (VPT) between 20 and 45 V to two treatment groups: active or sham treatment. Sixty patients (120 limbs) completed the study. Anodyne units were used at home every day for 40 min for 90 days. We evaluated nerve conduction velocities, VPT, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments (SWM) (4-, 10-, 26-, and 60-g monofilaments), the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI), a 10-cm visual analog pain scale, and a neuropathyspecific quality of life instrument. We used a nested repeated-measures multiple ANOVA design. Two sites (great toe and fifth metatarsal) were tested on both the left and right feet of each patient, so two feet were nested within each patient and two sites were nested within each foot. To analyze the ordinal SWM scores, we used a nonparametric factorial analysis for longitudinal data. RESULTS - There were no significant differences in measures for quality of life, MNSI, VPT, SWM, or nerve conduction velocities in active or sham treatment groups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS - Anodyne MIRE therapy was no more effective than sham therapy in the treatment of sensory neuropathy in individuals with diabetes.",
author = "Lavery, {Lawrence A.} and Murdoch, {Douglas P.} and Jayme Williams and Lavery, {David C.}",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
doi = "10.2337/dc07-1794",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "316--321",
journal = "Diabetes Care",
issn = "1935-5548",
publisher = "American Diabetes Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does anodyne light therapy improve peripheral neuropathy in diabetes? A double-blind, sham-controlled, randomized trial to evaluate monochromatic infrared photoenergy

AU - Lavery, Lawrence A.

AU - Murdoch, Douglas P.

AU - Williams, Jayme

AU - Lavery, David C.

PY - 2008/2

Y1 - 2008/2

N2 - OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of anodyne monochromatic infrared photo energy (MIRE) in-home treatments over a 90-day period to improve peripheral sensation and self-reported quality of life in individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trail. We randomly assigned 69 individuals with diabetes and a vibration perception threshold (VPT) between 20 and 45 V to two treatment groups: active or sham treatment. Sixty patients (120 limbs) completed the study. Anodyne units were used at home every day for 40 min for 90 days. We evaluated nerve conduction velocities, VPT, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments (SWM) (4-, 10-, 26-, and 60-g monofilaments), the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI), a 10-cm visual analog pain scale, and a neuropathyspecific quality of life instrument. We used a nested repeated-measures multiple ANOVA design. Two sites (great toe and fifth metatarsal) were tested on both the left and right feet of each patient, so two feet were nested within each patient and two sites were nested within each foot. To analyze the ordinal SWM scores, we used a nonparametric factorial analysis for longitudinal data. RESULTS - There were no significant differences in measures for quality of life, MNSI, VPT, SWM, or nerve conduction velocities in active or sham treatment groups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS - Anodyne MIRE therapy was no more effective than sham therapy in the treatment of sensory neuropathy in individuals with diabetes.

AB - OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of anodyne monochromatic infrared photo energy (MIRE) in-home treatments over a 90-day period to improve peripheral sensation and self-reported quality of life in individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trail. We randomly assigned 69 individuals with diabetes and a vibration perception threshold (VPT) between 20 and 45 V to two treatment groups: active or sham treatment. Sixty patients (120 limbs) completed the study. Anodyne units were used at home every day for 40 min for 90 days. We evaluated nerve conduction velocities, VPT, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments (SWM) (4-, 10-, 26-, and 60-g monofilaments), the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI), a 10-cm visual analog pain scale, and a neuropathyspecific quality of life instrument. We used a nested repeated-measures multiple ANOVA design. Two sites (great toe and fifth metatarsal) were tested on both the left and right feet of each patient, so two feet were nested within each patient and two sites were nested within each foot. To analyze the ordinal SWM scores, we used a nonparametric factorial analysis for longitudinal data. RESULTS - There were no significant differences in measures for quality of life, MNSI, VPT, SWM, or nerve conduction velocities in active or sham treatment groups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS - Anodyne MIRE therapy was no more effective than sham therapy in the treatment of sensory neuropathy in individuals with diabetes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38949083202&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38949083202&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2337/dc07-1794

DO - 10.2337/dc07-1794

M3 - Article

C2 - 17977931

AN - SCOPUS:38949083202

VL - 31

SP - 316

EP - 321

JO - Diabetes Care

JF - Diabetes Care

SN - 1935-5548

IS - 2

ER -