Does language moderate the influence of information scanning and seeking on HPV knowledge and vaccine awareness and initiation among Hispanics?

Clare F. Stevens, Margaret O. Caughy, Simon Craddock Lee, Wendy P. Bishop, Jasmin A. Tiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether language moderates associations between three communication variables: media use, information scanning (attending to and remembering information) and seeking (actively looking for information), and three HPV outcomes: knowledge, vaccine awareness and vaccine initiation among Hispanics. Participants: Hispanic mothers of females aged 8-22 years (N5288) were surveyed. Methods: Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions investigated associations between communication variables and HPV outcomes. To examine moderation by language, we compared main effects and interaction models using the likelihood ratio test. Results: For English- and Spanish-speakers, Internet use was associated with more HPV knowledge and vaccine awareness, but not initiation. Scanning and seeking were associated with more knowledge, vaccine awareness, and initiation. Language moderated effects of scanning and seeking only on vaccine awareness. Spanish speakers who scanned for information were more likely to be aware of the vaccine than those who did not (80% vs 26%); Spanish speakers who sought information were also more likely to be aware (95% vs 55%). For English speakers, vaccine awareness did not differ between those who scanned and sought and those who did not. Conclusions: Effects of information scanning and seeking on HPV vaccine awareness were much greater for Spanish than for English speakers. Providers, therefore, should not assume that Spanish-speaking mothers are already aware of the vaccine. Our findings call attention to heterogeneity within Hispanics which could be particularly important when examining health communication and cancer prevention behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-102
Number of pages8
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume23
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 2013

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Papillomavirus Vaccines
Hispanic Americans
Language
Vaccines
Communications Media
Mothers
Health Communication
Internet
Logistic Models
Communication

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Health care disparities
  • Health communication
  • Hispanic Americans
  • HPV
  • Human papillomavirus vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does language moderate the influence of information scanning and seeking on HPV knowledge and vaccine awareness and initiation among Hispanics? / Stevens, Clare F.; Caughy, Margaret O.; Lee, Simon Craddock; Bishop, Wendy P.; Tiro, Jasmin A.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 23, No. 1, 12.2013, p. 95-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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