Does long-term use of unstable dentures weaken jaw muscles?

R. Caloss, M. Al-Arab, R. A. Finn, O. Lonergan, G. S. Throckmorton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although it is well known that conventional denture wearers have lower maximum bite forces than dentate subjects, no previous studies have compared the strength of the jaw muscles between these two groups. This study compared maximum bite forces, electromyographic (EMG) activity and estimated jaw muscle strength among three groups: (i) 17 edentulous subjects using newly acquired implant-retained overdentures (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years); (ii) 10 age-matched, fully dentate subjects (five men, five women; mean age 57·9 ± 11·0 years); and (iii) 39 young, fully dentate subjects (19 men, 20 women; mean age 24·4 ± 3·5 years). Electromyographic activity was recorded from subjects' bilateral superficial masseter and anterior temporalis muscles while they generated maximum voluntary bite forces at the right central incisor, right first premolar and right first molar positions. Jaw muscle strength was estimated as the ratio of average EMG activity for all four muscles to the maximum bite force. At all three bite positions, edentulous subjects produced maximum bite forces that were less than half that of dentate subjects. Edentulous subjects also produced significantly less EMG activity and had significantly lower estimated jaw muscle strength. Our results suggest that weakened jaw muscles are one factor contributing to lower maximum bite forces among users of conventional dentures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-261
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Oral Rehabilitation
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

Fingerprint

Bite Force
Dentures
Jaw
Muscle Strength
Muscles
Overlay Denture
Bicuspid
Bites and Stings
Incisor

Keywords

  • Bite force
  • Electromyography
  • Implant-retained overdentures
  • Jaw muscle strength
  • Mandibular implants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Does long-term use of unstable dentures weaken jaw muscles? / Caloss, R.; Al-Arab, M.; Finn, R. A.; Lonergan, O.; Throckmorton, G. S.

In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Vol. 37, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 256-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caloss, R. ; Al-Arab, M. ; Finn, R. A. ; Lonergan, O. ; Throckmorton, G. S. / Does long-term use of unstable dentures weaken jaw muscles?. In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation. 2010 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 256-261.
@article{2e5a389197a64870be00ccf958da56cb,
title = "Does long-term use of unstable dentures weaken jaw muscles?",
abstract = "Although it is well known that conventional denture wearers have lower maximum bite forces than dentate subjects, no previous studies have compared the strength of the jaw muscles between these two groups. This study compared maximum bite forces, electromyographic (EMG) activity and estimated jaw muscle strength among three groups: (i) 17 edentulous subjects using newly acquired implant-retained overdentures (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years); (ii) 10 age-matched, fully dentate subjects (five men, five women; mean age 57·9 ± 11·0 years); and (iii) 39 young, fully dentate subjects (19 men, 20 women; mean age 24·4 ± 3·5 years). Electromyographic activity was recorded from subjects' bilateral superficial masseter and anterior temporalis muscles while they generated maximum voluntary bite forces at the right central incisor, right first premolar and right first molar positions. Jaw muscle strength was estimated as the ratio of average EMG activity for all four muscles to the maximum bite force. At all three bite positions, edentulous subjects produced maximum bite forces that were less than half that of dentate subjects. Edentulous subjects also produced significantly less EMG activity and had significantly lower estimated jaw muscle strength. Our results suggest that weakened jaw muscles are one factor contributing to lower maximum bite forces among users of conventional dentures.",
keywords = "Bite force, Electromyography, Implant-retained overdentures, Jaw muscle strength, Mandibular implants",
author = "R. Caloss and M. Al-Arab and Finn, {R. A.} and O. Lonergan and Throckmorton, {G. S.}",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2842.2009.02046.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "256--261",
journal = "Journal of Oral Rehabilitation",
issn = "0305-182X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does long-term use of unstable dentures weaken jaw muscles?

AU - Caloss, R.

AU - Al-Arab, M.

AU - Finn, R. A.

AU - Lonergan, O.

AU - Throckmorton, G. S.

PY - 2010/4

Y1 - 2010/4

N2 - Although it is well known that conventional denture wearers have lower maximum bite forces than dentate subjects, no previous studies have compared the strength of the jaw muscles between these two groups. This study compared maximum bite forces, electromyographic (EMG) activity and estimated jaw muscle strength among three groups: (i) 17 edentulous subjects using newly acquired implant-retained overdentures (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years); (ii) 10 age-matched, fully dentate subjects (five men, five women; mean age 57·9 ± 11·0 years); and (iii) 39 young, fully dentate subjects (19 men, 20 women; mean age 24·4 ± 3·5 years). Electromyographic activity was recorded from subjects' bilateral superficial masseter and anterior temporalis muscles while they generated maximum voluntary bite forces at the right central incisor, right first premolar and right first molar positions. Jaw muscle strength was estimated as the ratio of average EMG activity for all four muscles to the maximum bite force. At all three bite positions, edentulous subjects produced maximum bite forces that were less than half that of dentate subjects. Edentulous subjects also produced significantly less EMG activity and had significantly lower estimated jaw muscle strength. Our results suggest that weakened jaw muscles are one factor contributing to lower maximum bite forces among users of conventional dentures.

AB - Although it is well known that conventional denture wearers have lower maximum bite forces than dentate subjects, no previous studies have compared the strength of the jaw muscles between these two groups. This study compared maximum bite forces, electromyographic (EMG) activity and estimated jaw muscle strength among three groups: (i) 17 edentulous subjects using newly acquired implant-retained overdentures (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years); (ii) 10 age-matched, fully dentate subjects (five men, five women; mean age 57·9 ± 11·0 years); and (iii) 39 young, fully dentate subjects (19 men, 20 women; mean age 24·4 ± 3·5 years). Electromyographic activity was recorded from subjects' bilateral superficial masseter and anterior temporalis muscles while they generated maximum voluntary bite forces at the right central incisor, right first premolar and right first molar positions. Jaw muscle strength was estimated as the ratio of average EMG activity for all four muscles to the maximum bite force. At all three bite positions, edentulous subjects produced maximum bite forces that were less than half that of dentate subjects. Edentulous subjects also produced significantly less EMG activity and had significantly lower estimated jaw muscle strength. Our results suggest that weakened jaw muscles are one factor contributing to lower maximum bite forces among users of conventional dentures.

KW - Bite force

KW - Electromyography

KW - Implant-retained overdentures

KW - Jaw muscle strength

KW - Mandibular implants

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954381112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77954381112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2842.2009.02046.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2842.2009.02046.x

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 256

EP - 261

JO - Journal of Oral Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Oral Rehabilitation

SN - 0305-182X

IS - 4

ER -