Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance?

Jeryl D. English, P. H. Buschang, G. S. Throckmorton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This purpose of this study was to evaluate the largely untested assumption that malocclusion negatively affects masticatory performance. A sample of 185 untreated subjects (48% male and 52% female) from 7 to 37 years of age, representing subjects with normal occlusion (n = 38), Class I (n = 56), Class II (n = 45), and Class III (n = 46) malocclusion, were evaluated. Masticatory performance was evaluated objectively using artificial (CutterSil®, median particle size and broadness of the distribution) and real foods (number of chews for jerky and almonds), and subjectively using a visual analog scale. The results showed no significant differences in age or the body mass index (Wt/Ht2) between the occlusion groups. Subjects with normal occlusion had significantly smaller particle sizes (P = .001) and broader particle distributions (P < .001) than subjects with malocclusion. Compared with the normal occlusion group, the median particle sizes for the Class I, II, and III malocclusion groups were approximately 9%, 15%, and 34% larger, respectively. There were also significant group differences in their subjective ability to chew fresh carrots or celery (P = .019) and firm meat (P = .003). Class III subjects reported the greatest difficultly, followed by Class II subjects, Class I subjects, and subjects with normal occlusion, respectively. We conclude that malocclusion negatively affects subjects' ability to process and break down foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-27
Number of pages7
JournalAngle Orthodontist
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 2002

Fingerprint

Malocclusion
Particle Size
Apium graveolens
Food
Daucus carota
Visual Analog Scale
Meat
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • Human
  • Mastication
  • Masticatory ability
  • Oral function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

English, J. D., Buschang, P. H., & Throckmorton, G. S. (2002). Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance? Angle Orthodontist, 72(1), 21-27.

Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance? / English, Jeryl D.; Buschang, P. H.; Throckmorton, G. S.

In: Angle Orthodontist, Vol. 72, No. 1, 02.2002, p. 21-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

English, JD, Buschang, PH & Throckmorton, GS 2002, 'Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance?', Angle Orthodontist, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 21-27.
English JD, Buschang PH, Throckmorton GS. Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance? Angle Orthodontist. 2002 Feb;72(1):21-27.
English, Jeryl D. ; Buschang, P. H. ; Throckmorton, G. S. / Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance?. In: Angle Orthodontist. 2002 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 21-27.
@article{d4ea9ef2ab2e4bb89ce8bc98674cae0c,
title = "Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance?",
abstract = "This purpose of this study was to evaluate the largely untested assumption that malocclusion negatively affects masticatory performance. A sample of 185 untreated subjects (48{\%} male and 52{\%} female) from 7 to 37 years of age, representing subjects with normal occlusion (n = 38), Class I (n = 56), Class II (n = 45), and Class III (n = 46) malocclusion, were evaluated. Masticatory performance was evaluated objectively using artificial (CutterSil{\circledR}, median particle size and broadness of the distribution) and real foods (number of chews for jerky and almonds), and subjectively using a visual analog scale. The results showed no significant differences in age or the body mass index (Wt/Ht2) between the occlusion groups. Subjects with normal occlusion had significantly smaller particle sizes (P = .001) and broader particle distributions (P < .001) than subjects with malocclusion. Compared with the normal occlusion group, the median particle sizes for the Class I, II, and III malocclusion groups were approximately 9{\%}, 15{\%}, and 34{\%} larger, respectively. There were also significant group differences in their subjective ability to chew fresh carrots or celery (P = .019) and firm meat (P = .003). Class III subjects reported the greatest difficultly, followed by Class II subjects, Class I subjects, and subjects with normal occlusion, respectively. We conclude that malocclusion negatively affects subjects' ability to process and break down foods.",
keywords = "Human, Mastication, Masticatory ability, Oral function",
author = "English, {Jeryl D.} and Buschang, {P. H.} and Throckmorton, {G. S.}",
year = "2002",
month = "2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "72",
pages = "21--27",
journal = "Angle Orthodontist",
issn = "0003-3219",
publisher = "E H Angle Orthodontists Research & Education Foundation, Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Malocclusion Affect Masticatory Performance?

AU - English, Jeryl D.

AU - Buschang, P. H.

AU - Throckmorton, G. S.

PY - 2002/2

Y1 - 2002/2

N2 - This purpose of this study was to evaluate the largely untested assumption that malocclusion negatively affects masticatory performance. A sample of 185 untreated subjects (48% male and 52% female) from 7 to 37 years of age, representing subjects with normal occlusion (n = 38), Class I (n = 56), Class II (n = 45), and Class III (n = 46) malocclusion, were evaluated. Masticatory performance was evaluated objectively using artificial (CutterSil®, median particle size and broadness of the distribution) and real foods (number of chews for jerky and almonds), and subjectively using a visual analog scale. The results showed no significant differences in age or the body mass index (Wt/Ht2) between the occlusion groups. Subjects with normal occlusion had significantly smaller particle sizes (P = .001) and broader particle distributions (P < .001) than subjects with malocclusion. Compared with the normal occlusion group, the median particle sizes for the Class I, II, and III malocclusion groups were approximately 9%, 15%, and 34% larger, respectively. There were also significant group differences in their subjective ability to chew fresh carrots or celery (P = .019) and firm meat (P = .003). Class III subjects reported the greatest difficultly, followed by Class II subjects, Class I subjects, and subjects with normal occlusion, respectively. We conclude that malocclusion negatively affects subjects' ability to process and break down foods.

AB - This purpose of this study was to evaluate the largely untested assumption that malocclusion negatively affects masticatory performance. A sample of 185 untreated subjects (48% male and 52% female) from 7 to 37 years of age, representing subjects with normal occlusion (n = 38), Class I (n = 56), Class II (n = 45), and Class III (n = 46) malocclusion, were evaluated. Masticatory performance was evaluated objectively using artificial (CutterSil®, median particle size and broadness of the distribution) and real foods (number of chews for jerky and almonds), and subjectively using a visual analog scale. The results showed no significant differences in age or the body mass index (Wt/Ht2) between the occlusion groups. Subjects with normal occlusion had significantly smaller particle sizes (P = .001) and broader particle distributions (P < .001) than subjects with malocclusion. Compared with the normal occlusion group, the median particle sizes for the Class I, II, and III malocclusion groups were approximately 9%, 15%, and 34% larger, respectively. There were also significant group differences in their subjective ability to chew fresh carrots or celery (P = .019) and firm meat (P = .003). Class III subjects reported the greatest difficultly, followed by Class II subjects, Class I subjects, and subjects with normal occlusion, respectively. We conclude that malocclusion negatively affects subjects' ability to process and break down foods.

KW - Human

KW - Mastication

KW - Masticatory ability

KW - Oral function

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036480380&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036480380&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 72

SP - 21

EP - 27

JO - Angle Orthodontist

JF - Angle Orthodontist

SN - 0003-3219

IS - 1

ER -