Does negative pressure wound therapy with irrigation improve clinical outcomes? A randomized clinical trial in patients with diabetic foot infections

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To compare the efficacy of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) with and without irrigation with 0.1% polyhexanide-betaine. Methods: We randomized 150 subjects in a 16-week RCT to compare healing in patients with diabetic foot infections. NPWT delivered at 125 mm Hg continuous pressure. NPWT-I were administered at 30 cc per hour. Results: There were no differences clinical treatment or outcomes: wound area after surgery (18.5 ± 19.0 vs. 13.4 ± 11.1 cm2, p = 0.50), duration of antibiotics (39.7 ± 21.0 vs. 38.0 ± 24.6 days, p = 0.40), number of surgeries (2.3 ± 0.67 vs. 2.2 ± 0.59, p = 0.85), duration of NPWT (148.1 ± 170.4 vs. 114.5 ± 135.1 h, p = 0.06), healed wounds (58.7% vs. 60.0%, p = 0.86), time to healing (56.3 ± 31.7 vs. 50.7 ± 27.8, p = 0.53), length of stay (13.8 ± 6.4 vs. 14.5 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.42), re-infection (20.0% vs. 22.7%, p = 0.69, and re-hospitalization (17.3% vs. 18.7, p = 0.83). Conclusions: The addition of irrigation to NPWT did not change clinical outcomes in patients with diabetic foot infections. Clinical trial number: NCT02463487, ClinicalTrials.gov.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Amputation
  • Diabetes
  • Infection
  • Negative pressure wound therapy
  • Osteomyelitis
  • Ulcer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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