Does supracervical hysterectomy provide more support to the vaginal apex than total abdominal hysterectomy?

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to assess whether cervical preservation at the time of hysterectomy may help prevent subsequent apical vaginal vault prolapse. Study Design: Supracervical hysterectomies were performed in 12 unembalmed cadavers. Successive hanging weights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg were loaded against the cervical stump and distances moved were recorded. The same process was repeated after completion of a total hysterectomy. Results: Average distances pulled with 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg of traction against the cervical stump were 17.8 ± 1.9, 24.1 ± 2.5, 29.0 ± 2.8, and 34.3 ± 3.5 mm, respectively. After total hysterectomy, these distances were 17.5 ± 2.5, 23.5 ± 2.6, 29.3 ± 3.1, and 34.5 ± 3.6 mm, respectively. Conclusion: In unembalmed cadavers, it appears that total abdominal hysterectomy and supracervical hysterectomy provide equal resistance to forces applied to the vaginal apex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume197
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Hysterectomy
Cadaver
Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Traction
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • anatomy
  • apical support
  • prolapse
  • subtotal hysterectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

@article{c40d5ed34f99401b81dab420dac0ee83,
title = "Does supracervical hysterectomy provide more support to the vaginal apex than total abdominal hysterectomy?",
abstract = "Objective: The objective of the study was to assess whether cervical preservation at the time of hysterectomy may help prevent subsequent apical vaginal vault prolapse. Study Design: Supracervical hysterectomies were performed in 12 unembalmed cadavers. Successive hanging weights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg were loaded against the cervical stump and distances moved were recorded. The same process was repeated after completion of a total hysterectomy. Results: Average distances pulled with 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg of traction against the cervical stump were 17.8 ± 1.9, 24.1 ± 2.5, 29.0 ± 2.8, and 34.3 ± 3.5 mm, respectively. After total hysterectomy, these distances were 17.5 ± 2.5, 23.5 ± 2.6, 29.3 ± 3.1, and 34.5 ± 3.6 mm, respectively. Conclusion: In unembalmed cadavers, it appears that total abdominal hysterectomy and supracervical hysterectomy provide equal resistance to forces applied to the vaginal apex.",
keywords = "anatomy, apical support, prolapse, subtotal hysterectomy",
author = "Rahn, {David D.} and Marker, {Allison C.} and Corton, {Marlene M.} and Roshanravan, {Shayzreen M.} and McIntire, {Donald D.} and Schaffer, {Joseph I.} and Wai, {Clifford Y.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajog.2007.08.050",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "197",
journal = "American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0002-9378",
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number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Does supracervical hysterectomy provide more support to the vaginal apex than total abdominal hysterectomy?

AU - Rahn, David D.

AU - Marker, Allison C.

AU - Corton, Marlene M.

AU - Roshanravan, Shayzreen M.

AU - McIntire, Donald D.

AU - Schaffer, Joseph I.

AU - Wai, Clifford Y.

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - Objective: The objective of the study was to assess whether cervical preservation at the time of hysterectomy may help prevent subsequent apical vaginal vault prolapse. Study Design: Supracervical hysterectomies were performed in 12 unembalmed cadavers. Successive hanging weights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg were loaded against the cervical stump and distances moved were recorded. The same process was repeated after completion of a total hysterectomy. Results: Average distances pulled with 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg of traction against the cervical stump were 17.8 ± 1.9, 24.1 ± 2.5, 29.0 ± 2.8, and 34.3 ± 3.5 mm, respectively. After total hysterectomy, these distances were 17.5 ± 2.5, 23.5 ± 2.6, 29.3 ± 3.1, and 34.5 ± 3.6 mm, respectively. Conclusion: In unembalmed cadavers, it appears that total abdominal hysterectomy and supracervical hysterectomy provide equal resistance to forces applied to the vaginal apex.

AB - Objective: The objective of the study was to assess whether cervical preservation at the time of hysterectomy may help prevent subsequent apical vaginal vault prolapse. Study Design: Supracervical hysterectomies were performed in 12 unembalmed cadavers. Successive hanging weights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg were loaded against the cervical stump and distances moved were recorded. The same process was repeated after completion of a total hysterectomy. Results: Average distances pulled with 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg of traction against the cervical stump were 17.8 ± 1.9, 24.1 ± 2.5, 29.0 ± 2.8, and 34.3 ± 3.5 mm, respectively. After total hysterectomy, these distances were 17.5 ± 2.5, 23.5 ± 2.6, 29.3 ± 3.1, and 34.5 ± 3.6 mm, respectively. Conclusion: In unembalmed cadavers, it appears that total abdominal hysterectomy and supracervical hysterectomy provide equal resistance to forces applied to the vaginal apex.

KW - anatomy

KW - apical support

KW - prolapse

KW - subtotal hysterectomy

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