Dose effects of aspirin on gastric prostaglandins and stomach mucosal injury

Makau Lee, Byron Cryer, Mark Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if a dose of aspirin exists that might inhibit thromboxane-dependent platelet function without causing gastric mucosal injury, we studied the effects of a wide range of doses of aspirin (3 mg/d to 2600 mg/d) on gastric juice prostaglandins (PGE2 and PGF(2α)), on serum thromboxane B2, and on stomach mucosal injury as reflected by gastric juice hemoglobin and DNA concentrations. Design: A randomized, placebo-controlled study. Setting: Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants: 16 healthy volunteers (5 men and 11 women). Intervention: In the first part of the study, volunteers received placebo; aspirin, 324 mg/d; 1300 mg/d; or 2600 mg/d for 2 days. In the second part, volunteers received placebo; aspirin, 3 mg/d; 10 mg/d; 30 mg/d; or 81 mg/d for 8 days. Measurements: Gastric juice PGE2 and PGF(2α), hemoglobin and DNA concentrations; gastric juice volume and acidity; and serum salicylate and thromboxane B2 concentrations. Results: In the first part, significant and similar (approximately 50%) inhibition of gastric juice prostaglandin output was observed with daily aspirin doses of 324 to 2600 mg. However, a significant increase in gastric juice hemoglobin output occurred only with 2600 mg/d. In the second part, significant inhibition (approximately 50%) of gastric PGE2 output was noted at a daily aspirin dose of 30 mg. Lower aspirin doses did not reduce PGE2 output significantly, although these doses did significantly reduce serum thromboxane B2 in a dose-related manner. Conclusions: Aspirin can significantly reduce serum thromboxane B2 at doses of 3 mg/d or 10 mg/d, which are significantly below the threshold dose for significant gastric prostaglandin inhibition and acute stomach mucosal injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-189
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume120
Issue number3
StatePublished - Feb 1 1994

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Aspirin
Gastric Juice
Prostaglandins
Stomach
Thromboxane B2
Wounds and Injuries
Dinoprostone
Hemoglobins
Placebos
Prostaglandins F
Serum
Volunteers
Salicylates
Thromboxanes
DNA
Veterans
Healthy Volunteers
Blood Platelets
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dose effects of aspirin on gastric prostaglandins and stomach mucosal injury. / Lee, Makau; Cryer, Byron; Feldman, Mark.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 120, No. 3, 01.02.1994, p. 184-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To determine if a dose of aspirin exists that might inhibit thromboxane-dependent platelet function without causing gastric mucosal injury, we studied the effects of a wide range of doses of aspirin (3 mg/d to 2600 mg/d) on gastric juice prostaglandins (PGE2 and PGF(2α)), on serum thromboxane B2, and on stomach mucosal injury as reflected by gastric juice hemoglobin and DNA concentrations. Design: A randomized, placebo-controlled study. Setting: Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants: 16 healthy volunteers (5 men and 11 women). Intervention: In the first part of the study, volunteers received placebo; aspirin, 324 mg/d; 1300 mg/d; or 2600 mg/d for 2 days. In the second part, volunteers received placebo; aspirin, 3 mg/d; 10 mg/d; 30 mg/d; or 81 mg/d for 8 days. Measurements: Gastric juice PGE2 and PGF(2α), hemoglobin and DNA concentrations; gastric juice volume and acidity; and serum salicylate and thromboxane B2 concentrations. Results: In the first part, significant and similar (approximately 50{\%}) inhibition of gastric juice prostaglandin output was observed with daily aspirin doses of 324 to 2600 mg. However, a significant increase in gastric juice hemoglobin output occurred only with 2600 mg/d. In the second part, significant inhibition (approximately 50{\%}) of gastric PGE2 output was noted at a daily aspirin dose of 30 mg. Lower aspirin doses did not reduce PGE2 output significantly, although these doses did significantly reduce serum thromboxane B2 in a dose-related manner. Conclusions: Aspirin can significantly reduce serum thromboxane B2 at doses of 3 mg/d or 10 mg/d, which are significantly below the threshold dose for significant gastric prostaglandin inhibition and acute stomach mucosal injury.",
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