Dosing a synbiotic of human milk oligosaccharides and B. infantis leads to reversible engraftment in healthy adult microbiomes without antibiotics

Julie E. Button, Chloe A. Autran, Abigail L. Reens, Casey M. Cosetta, Steven Smriga, Megan Ericson, Jessica V. Pierce, David N. Cook, Martin L. Lee, Adam K. Sun, Amin M. Alousi, Andrew Y. Koh, David J. Rechtman, Robert R. Jenq, Gregory J. McKenzie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Predictable and sustainable engraftment of live biotherapeutic products into the human gut microbiome is being explored as a promising way to modulate the human gut microbiome. We utilize a synbiotic approach pairing the infant gut microbe Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis (B. infantis) and human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). B. infantis, which is typically absent in adults, engrafts into healthy adult microbiomes in an HMO-dependent manner at a relative abundance of up to 25% of the bacterial population without antibiotic pretreatment or adverse effects. Corresponding changes in metabolites are detected. Germ-free mice transplanted with dysbiotic human microbiomes also successfully engraft with B. infantis in an HMO-dependent manner, and the synbiotic augments butyrate levels both in this in vivo model and in in vitro cocultures of the synbiotic with specific Firmicutes species. Finally, the synbiotic inhibits the growth of enteropathogens in vitro. Our findings point to a potential safe mechanism for ameliorating dysbioses characteristic of numerous human diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-725.e7
JournalCell Host and Microbe
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 11 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • B. infantis
  • Bifidobacterium
  • gut engraftment
  • gut microbiome
  • gut microbiota
  • HMO
  • human milk oligosaccharides
  • LBP
  • live biotherapeutic product
  • microbiome modulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Virology

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