Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

Jennifer L. Nguyen, Mark S. Link, Heike Luttmann-Gibson, Francine Laden, Joel Schwartz, Benjamin S. Wessler, Murray A. Mittleman, Diane R. Gold, Douglas W. Dockery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: the few previous studies on the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and meteorologic conditions have focused on outdoor temperature and hospital admissions, but hospital admissions are a crude indicator of atrial fibrillation incidence, and studies have found other weather measures in addition to temperature to be associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: two hundred patients with dual chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillators were enrolled and followed prospectively from 2006 to 2010 for new onset episodes of atrial fibrillation. the date and time of arrhythmia episodes documented by the implanted cardioverterdefibrillators were linked to meteorologic data and examined using a case-crossover analysis. We evaluated associations with outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, air pressure, and three measures of humidity (relative humidity, dew point, and absolute humidity). Results: Of the 200 enrolled patients, 49 patients experienced 328 atrial fibrillation episodes lasting ≥30 seconds. lower temperatures in the prior 48 hours were positively associated with atrial fibrillation. lower absolute humidity (ie, drier air) had the strongest and most consistent association: each 0.5 g/m3 decrease in the prior 24 hours increased the odds of atrial fibrillation by 4% (95% confidence interval [ci]: 0%, 7%) and by 5% (95% ci: 2%, 8%) for exposure in the prior 2 hours. results were similar for dew point but slightly weaker. Conclusions: recent exposure to drier air and lower temperatures were associated with the onset of atrial fibrillation among patients with known cardiac disease, supporting the hypothesis that meteorologic conditions trigger acute cardiovascular episodes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-380
Number of pages7
JournalEpidemiology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Atrial Fibrillation
Air
Temperature
Humidity
Confidence Intervals
Air Pressure
Implantable Defibrillators
Weather
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Heart Diseases
Cohort Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Nguyen, J. L., Link, M. S., Luttmann-Gibson, H., Laden, F., Schwartz, J., Wessler, B. S., ... Dockery, D. W. (2015). Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Epidemiology, 26(3), 374-380. https://doi.org/10.1097/eDe.0000000000000284

Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. / Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Link, Mark S.; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Laden, Francine; Schwartz, Joel; Wessler, Benjamin S.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Gold, Diane R.; Dockery, Douglas W.

In: Epidemiology, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 374-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nguyen, JL, Link, MS, Luttmann-Gibson, H, Laden, F, Schwartz, J, Wessler, BS, Mittleman, MA, Gold, DR & Dockery, DW 2015, 'Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation', Epidemiology, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 374-380. https://doi.org/10.1097/eDe.0000000000000284
Nguyen JL, Link MS, Luttmann-Gibson H, Laden F, Schwartz J, Wessler BS et al. Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Epidemiology. 2015 Jan 1;26(3):374-380. https://doi.org/10.1097/eDe.0000000000000284
Nguyen, Jennifer L. ; Link, Mark S. ; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike ; Laden, Francine ; Schwartz, Joel ; Wessler, Benjamin S. ; Mittleman, Murray A. ; Gold, Diane R. ; Dockery, Douglas W. / Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In: Epidemiology. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 374-380.
@article{bfac940ce6e54b33a376fda15648659c,
title = "Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation",
abstract = "Background: the few previous studies on the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and meteorologic conditions have focused on outdoor temperature and hospital admissions, but hospital admissions are a crude indicator of atrial fibrillation incidence, and studies have found other weather measures in addition to temperature to be associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: two hundred patients with dual chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillators were enrolled and followed prospectively from 2006 to 2010 for new onset episodes of atrial fibrillation. the date and time of arrhythmia episodes documented by the implanted cardioverterdefibrillators were linked to meteorologic data and examined using a case-crossover analysis. We evaluated associations with outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, air pressure, and three measures of humidity (relative humidity, dew point, and absolute humidity). Results: Of the 200 enrolled patients, 49 patients experienced 328 atrial fibrillation episodes lasting ≥30 seconds. lower temperatures in the prior 48 hours were positively associated with atrial fibrillation. lower absolute humidity (ie, drier air) had the strongest and most consistent association: each 0.5 g/m3 decrease in the prior 24 hours increased the odds of atrial fibrillation by 4{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [ci]: 0{\%}, 7{\%}) and by 5{\%} (95{\%} ci: 2{\%}, 8{\%}) for exposure in the prior 2 hours. results were similar for dew point but slightly weaker. Conclusions: recent exposure to drier air and lower temperatures were associated with the onset of atrial fibrillation among patients with known cardiac disease, supporting the hypothesis that meteorologic conditions trigger acute cardiovascular episodes.",
author = "Nguyen, {Jennifer L.} and Link, {Mark S.} and Heike Luttmann-Gibson and Francine Laden and Joel Schwartz and Wessler, {Benjamin S.} and Mittleman, {Murray A.} and Gold, {Diane R.} and Dockery, {Douglas W.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/eDe.0000000000000284",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "374--380",
journal = "Epidemiology",
issn = "1044-3983",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Drier air, lower temperatures, and triggering of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

AU - Nguyen, Jennifer L.

AU - Link, Mark S.

AU - Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

AU - Laden, Francine

AU - Schwartz, Joel

AU - Wessler, Benjamin S.

AU - Mittleman, Murray A.

AU - Gold, Diane R.

AU - Dockery, Douglas W.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: the few previous studies on the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and meteorologic conditions have focused on outdoor temperature and hospital admissions, but hospital admissions are a crude indicator of atrial fibrillation incidence, and studies have found other weather measures in addition to temperature to be associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: two hundred patients with dual chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillators were enrolled and followed prospectively from 2006 to 2010 for new onset episodes of atrial fibrillation. the date and time of arrhythmia episodes documented by the implanted cardioverterdefibrillators were linked to meteorologic data and examined using a case-crossover analysis. We evaluated associations with outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, air pressure, and three measures of humidity (relative humidity, dew point, and absolute humidity). Results: Of the 200 enrolled patients, 49 patients experienced 328 atrial fibrillation episodes lasting ≥30 seconds. lower temperatures in the prior 48 hours were positively associated with atrial fibrillation. lower absolute humidity (ie, drier air) had the strongest and most consistent association: each 0.5 g/m3 decrease in the prior 24 hours increased the odds of atrial fibrillation by 4% (95% confidence interval [ci]: 0%, 7%) and by 5% (95% ci: 2%, 8%) for exposure in the prior 2 hours. results were similar for dew point but slightly weaker. Conclusions: recent exposure to drier air and lower temperatures were associated with the onset of atrial fibrillation among patients with known cardiac disease, supporting the hypothesis that meteorologic conditions trigger acute cardiovascular episodes.

AB - Background: the few previous studies on the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and meteorologic conditions have focused on outdoor temperature and hospital admissions, but hospital admissions are a crude indicator of atrial fibrillation incidence, and studies have found other weather measures in addition to temperature to be associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: two hundred patients with dual chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillators were enrolled and followed prospectively from 2006 to 2010 for new onset episodes of atrial fibrillation. the date and time of arrhythmia episodes documented by the implanted cardioverterdefibrillators were linked to meteorologic data and examined using a case-crossover analysis. We evaluated associations with outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, air pressure, and three measures of humidity (relative humidity, dew point, and absolute humidity). Results: Of the 200 enrolled patients, 49 patients experienced 328 atrial fibrillation episodes lasting ≥30 seconds. lower temperatures in the prior 48 hours were positively associated with atrial fibrillation. lower absolute humidity (ie, drier air) had the strongest and most consistent association: each 0.5 g/m3 decrease in the prior 24 hours increased the odds of atrial fibrillation by 4% (95% confidence interval [ci]: 0%, 7%) and by 5% (95% ci: 2%, 8%) for exposure in the prior 2 hours. results were similar for dew point but slightly weaker. Conclusions: recent exposure to drier air and lower temperatures were associated with the onset of atrial fibrillation among patients with known cardiac disease, supporting the hypothesis that meteorologic conditions trigger acute cardiovascular episodes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84937403313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84937403313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/eDe.0000000000000284

DO - 10.1097/eDe.0000000000000284

M3 - Article

C2 - 25756220

AN - SCOPUS:84937403313

VL - 26

SP - 374

EP - 380

JO - Epidemiology

JF - Epidemiology

SN - 1044-3983

IS - 3

ER -