Dual-energy CT-generated bone marrow oedema maps improve timely visualisation and recognition of acute lower extremity fractures

A. Narayanan, N. Dettori, M. Chalian, Y. Xi, A. Komarraju, A. Chhabra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

AIM: To assesses whether utilising bone marrow oedema (BMO) maps improved fracture read times and reader confidence in a large series of acute lower extremity trauma dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) studies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and six DECT studies, including 60 fracture cases and 46 non-fracture cases, were evaluated retrospectively in this cross-sectional study. Three-dimensional (3D) BMO maps were generated for each study and coded to display skeletal anatomy in blue and marrow oedema in green. Studies were interpreted by two readers in two timed stages (without and with BMO maps). Readers identified the number, anatomical location, and comminution of fractures. Reader confidence (five-point Likert scale) for fracture identification and anatomical regions where oedema was present was also recorded. RESULTS: Decreased read times (p<0.01) were observed when readers utilised BMO maps for their fracture search. The presence of oedema on BMO maps corresponded with associated fracture in 75.7% reads. No differences in reader confidence were observed as a result of using this BMO-guided technique (>95%, 5/5 for both readers with and without the aid of BMO maps). CONCLUSIONS: DECT BMO maps improve the speed of radiological identification of suspected acute lower extremity fractures with preserved reader confidence. It may help emergent detection of fractures, important for patient management and outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)710.e9-710.e14
JournalClinical Radiology
Volume76
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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