Early binocular visual experience may improve binocular sensory outcomes in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract

Brett G. Jeffrey, Eileen E. Birch, David R. Stager, David R. Stager, David R. Weakley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the effect of intensive and reduced occlusion therapy regimens on binocular sensory outcomes, visual acuity, and the prevalence of strabismus in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract. Methods:Two nonrandomized groups of patients were studied prospectively: (1) an intensive occlusion group (n = 29) patched 80% of waking hours were followed for a median 6.9 years and (2) a reduced occlusion group (n = 8) patched 25% to 50% of waking hours were followed for a median 4.3 years. Six subjects in the intensive group and 4 in the reduced occlusion group had secondary intraocular lenses. Two subjects in the intensive group had epi-keratophakia surgery. Binocular sensory function was assessed with random dot and contour stereoacuity tests and the Worth 4-dot test. The prevalence and age at onset of strabismus were determined from the patients' charts. Results: A higher proportion of subjects in the reduced occlusion group (50%) had stereoacuity or fusion compared with the intensive occlusion group (14%), a borderline significant difference (P=.08). No significant difference (P = .55) was found in median visual acuity between the intensive (20/50) and the reduced occlusion (20/55) groups. The 90% prevalence of strabismus in the intensive occlusion group was slightly higher than the 63% prevalence in the reduced occlusion group, although this difference was not significant (P=.18). Conclusions: These results suggest that a reduced occlusion protocol may be associated with better binocular sensory outcomes and a reduced prevalence of strabismus without compromising good visual acuity in children treated for congenital unilateral cataract.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-216
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2001

Fingerprint

Cataract
Strabismus
Visual Acuity
Intraocular Lenses
Age of Onset
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Early binocular visual experience may improve binocular sensory outcomes in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract. / Jeffrey, Brett G.; Birch, Eileen E.; Stager, David R.; Stager, David R.; Weakley, David R.

In: Journal of AAPOS, Vol. 5, No. 4, 08.2001, p. 209-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeffrey, Brett G. ; Birch, Eileen E. ; Stager, David R. ; Stager, David R. ; Weakley, David R. / Early binocular visual experience may improve binocular sensory outcomes in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract. In: Journal of AAPOS. 2001 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 209-216.
@article{a3c421d2180b49efa3c464bc65b82565,
title = "Early binocular visual experience may improve binocular sensory outcomes in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract",
abstract = "Purpose: To compare the effect of intensive and reduced occlusion therapy regimens on binocular sensory outcomes, visual acuity, and the prevalence of strabismus in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract. Methods:Two nonrandomized groups of patients were studied prospectively: (1) an intensive occlusion group (n = 29) patched 80{\%} of waking hours were followed for a median 6.9 years and (2) a reduced occlusion group (n = 8) patched 25{\%} to 50{\%} of waking hours were followed for a median 4.3 years. Six subjects in the intensive group and 4 in the reduced occlusion group had secondary intraocular lenses. Two subjects in the intensive group had epi-keratophakia surgery. Binocular sensory function was assessed with random dot and contour stereoacuity tests and the Worth 4-dot test. The prevalence and age at onset of strabismus were determined from the patients' charts. Results: A higher proportion of subjects in the reduced occlusion group (50{\%}) had stereoacuity or fusion compared with the intensive occlusion group (14{\%}), a borderline significant difference (P=.08). No significant difference (P = .55) was found in median visual acuity between the intensive (20/50) and the reduced occlusion (20/55) groups. The 90{\%} prevalence of strabismus in the intensive occlusion group was slightly higher than the 63{\%} prevalence in the reduced occlusion group, although this difference was not significant (P=.18). Conclusions: These results suggest that a reduced occlusion protocol may be associated with better binocular sensory outcomes and a reduced prevalence of strabismus without compromising good visual acuity in children treated for congenital unilateral cataract.",
author = "Jeffrey, {Brett G.} and Birch, {Eileen E.} and Stager, {David R.} and Stager, {David R.} and Weakley, {David R.}",
year = "2001",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1067/mpa.2001.115591",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "209--216",
journal = "Journal of AAPOS",
issn = "1091-8531",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early binocular visual experience may improve binocular sensory outcomes in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract

AU - Jeffrey, Brett G.

AU - Birch, Eileen E.

AU - Stager, David R.

AU - Stager, David R.

AU - Weakley, David R.

PY - 2001/8

Y1 - 2001/8

N2 - Purpose: To compare the effect of intensive and reduced occlusion therapy regimens on binocular sensory outcomes, visual acuity, and the prevalence of strabismus in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract. Methods:Two nonrandomized groups of patients were studied prospectively: (1) an intensive occlusion group (n = 29) patched 80% of waking hours were followed for a median 6.9 years and (2) a reduced occlusion group (n = 8) patched 25% to 50% of waking hours were followed for a median 4.3 years. Six subjects in the intensive group and 4 in the reduced occlusion group had secondary intraocular lenses. Two subjects in the intensive group had epi-keratophakia surgery. Binocular sensory function was assessed with random dot and contour stereoacuity tests and the Worth 4-dot test. The prevalence and age at onset of strabismus were determined from the patients' charts. Results: A higher proportion of subjects in the reduced occlusion group (50%) had stereoacuity or fusion compared with the intensive occlusion group (14%), a borderline significant difference (P=.08). No significant difference (P = .55) was found in median visual acuity between the intensive (20/50) and the reduced occlusion (20/55) groups. The 90% prevalence of strabismus in the intensive occlusion group was slightly higher than the 63% prevalence in the reduced occlusion group, although this difference was not significant (P=.18). Conclusions: These results suggest that a reduced occlusion protocol may be associated with better binocular sensory outcomes and a reduced prevalence of strabismus without compromising good visual acuity in children treated for congenital unilateral cataract.

AB - Purpose: To compare the effect of intensive and reduced occlusion therapy regimens on binocular sensory outcomes, visual acuity, and the prevalence of strabismus in children after surgery for congenital unilateral cataract. Methods:Two nonrandomized groups of patients were studied prospectively: (1) an intensive occlusion group (n = 29) patched 80% of waking hours were followed for a median 6.9 years and (2) a reduced occlusion group (n = 8) patched 25% to 50% of waking hours were followed for a median 4.3 years. Six subjects in the intensive group and 4 in the reduced occlusion group had secondary intraocular lenses. Two subjects in the intensive group had epi-keratophakia surgery. Binocular sensory function was assessed with random dot and contour stereoacuity tests and the Worth 4-dot test. The prevalence and age at onset of strabismus were determined from the patients' charts. Results: A higher proportion of subjects in the reduced occlusion group (50%) had stereoacuity or fusion compared with the intensive occlusion group (14%), a borderline significant difference (P=.08). No significant difference (P = .55) was found in median visual acuity between the intensive (20/50) and the reduced occlusion (20/55) groups. The 90% prevalence of strabismus in the intensive occlusion group was slightly higher than the 63% prevalence in the reduced occlusion group, although this difference was not significant (P=.18). Conclusions: These results suggest that a reduced occlusion protocol may be associated with better binocular sensory outcomes and a reduced prevalence of strabismus without compromising good visual acuity in children treated for congenital unilateral cataract.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035430747&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035430747&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1067/mpa.2001.115591

DO - 10.1067/mpa.2001.115591

M3 - Article

C2 - 11507579

AN - SCOPUS:0035430747

VL - 5

SP - 209

EP - 216

JO - Journal of AAPOS

JF - Journal of AAPOS

SN - 1091-8531

IS - 4

ER -