Early mortality following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

J. A. Zurasky, V. Aiyagari, A. R. Zazulia, A. Shackelford, Michael N. Diringer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors reviewed the charts of 1,421 patients with cerebral hemorrhage to determine the cause of death. Limitation or withdrawal of life-sustaining interventions was the most common cause of death (68%) followed by brain death (28%). Neurologic reasons were the most common cause of delayed decisions to withdraw or limit therapy. Brain death was more common in African Americans, whereas life-sustaining interventions were withdrawn or limited early more often in whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-727
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume64
Issue number4
StatePublished - Feb 22 2005

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Brain Death
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Cause of Death
Mortality
African Americans
Nervous System
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Zurasky, J. A., Aiyagari, V., Zazulia, A. R., Shackelford, A., & Diringer, M. N. (2005). Early mortality following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Neurology, 64(4), 725-727.

Early mortality following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. / Zurasky, J. A.; Aiyagari, V.; Zazulia, A. R.; Shackelford, A.; Diringer, Michael N.

In: Neurology, Vol. 64, No. 4, 22.02.2005, p. 725-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zurasky, JA, Aiyagari, V, Zazulia, AR, Shackelford, A & Diringer, MN 2005, 'Early mortality following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage', Neurology, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 725-727.
Zurasky JA, Aiyagari V, Zazulia AR, Shackelford A, Diringer MN. Early mortality following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Neurology. 2005 Feb 22;64(4):725-727.
Zurasky, J. A. ; Aiyagari, V. ; Zazulia, A. R. ; Shackelford, A. ; Diringer, Michael N. / Early mortality following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. In: Neurology. 2005 ; Vol. 64, No. 4. pp. 725-727.
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