Eccentric exercise augments the cardiovascular response to static exercise

Mary P. Miles, Yihua Li, John P. Rinard, Priscilla M. Clarkson, Jon W. Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

High-force eccentric exercise induces neuromuscular dysfunction and may augment the cardiovascular response to exercise. This investigation sought to determine whether changes in strength and sense of force following high- force eccentric exercise alter heart rate and blood pressure responses during isometric contractions. Subjects (4F,6M) performed 50 maximum resistance eccentric actions with one arm (ECC arm). Contractions at 10% of the ECC arm maximum were held for 7 min on two pre-exercise days. The force output perceived to be the same as 10% of the pre-exercise maximum was determined using a force matching task. This force, 35.6, 27.2, and 21.1% lower on days 1, 3, and 5 post-exercise, was held during isometric contractions on these days, respectively. Despite a lowering of absolute contraction force, heart rate (P < 0.05) and blood pressure (P < 0.001) responses during contractions using the ECC arm were consistently elevated relative to the control arm. However, subjects perceived that they were exerting forces similar to those achieved before eccentric exercise-induced neuromuscular dysfunction. These findings suggest that perceived effort following strength loss induced by mechanically stressful exercise dictates the cardiovascular responses during isometric contractions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-466
Number of pages10
JournalMedicine and science in sports and exercise
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1997

Keywords

  • ISOMETRIC CONTRACTION
  • MEAN ARTERIAL PRESSURE
  • MUSCLE DAMAGE
  • PERCEIVED EXERTION
  • SENSE OF FORCE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Eccentric exercise augments the cardiovascular response to static exercise'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this