Editorial Commentary: Third-Generation Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation—Are Cells Seeded Onto the Scaffold Itself in It for the Long Run?

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an increasingly performed procedure, with rapidly evolving technology. First-generation ACI used a periosteal patch, leading to the second generation, in which a type I–type III collagen membrane is used to cover the autologous chondrocytes, and ultimately the third generation, in which autologous chondrocytes are seeded onto the scaffold itself. As third-generation, scaffold-based ACI techniques are becoming more widely available, interest in the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes continues to grow, especially given the high costs associated with these procedures. Several studies have now shown persistently improved clinical outcomes at long-term follow-up, which support the increasing utilization of third-generation ACI techniques. However, it is important to continue to develop our understanding of the limitations of and expectations with third-generation ACI, particularly regarding reoperation, as well as to continue to design high-quality long-term studies that can evaluate differences in technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1939-1941
Number of pages3
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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