Effect of an evidence-based medicine seminar on participants' interpretations of clinical trials

A pilot study

P. Schoenfeld, D. Crues, W. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To evaluate the effect of evidence-based medicine (EBM) education on physicians' short-term and long-term understanding of research methods and statistics. Method. Twenty-four gastroenterology (Gl) fellows attended a three-day seminar about evidence-based medicine and the critical appraisal of medical literature. Attendees completed the same 14-item test on this material at the start of the seminar, at the conclusion of the seminar, and six months after the seminar. A Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were performed to determine the differences between test scores by testing date and performance on test items. Results. Seminar attendees improved their test scores between pre-seminar and post-seminar tests (mean test score: 57% ± 16% versus 82 ± 14%, respectively; p < .001) and between pre-seminar and six-month post-seminar tests (mean test score: 57% ± 16% versus 78% ± 13%, respectively; p < .001). Seminar attendees showed significant improvement in frequency of correct answers with individual questions on concealment of allocation, relative risk reduction, and meta-analysis trial methods. Conclusions. In this pilot study, the critical appraisal skills necessary to practice EBM were taught to Gl fellows in a seminar format that led to significant improvement in their understanding of research methods and statistics. Data from this pilot study justify a definitive trial examining the educational value of EBM seminars for physicians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1212-1214
Number of pages3
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume75
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Evidence-Based Medicine
Clinical Trials
medicine
interpretation
Gastroenterology
evidence
Physicians
Risk Reduction Behavior
Chi-Square Distribution
Research
Meta-Analysis
research method
Students
statistics
Education
physician

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

Effect of an evidence-based medicine seminar on participants' interpretations of clinical trials : A pilot study. / Schoenfeld, P.; Crues, D.; Peterson, W.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 75, No. 12, 2000, p. 1212-1214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schoenfeld, P. ; Crues, D. ; Peterson, W. / Effect of an evidence-based medicine seminar on participants' interpretations of clinical trials : A pilot study. In: Academic Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 75, No. 12. pp. 1212-1214.
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