Effect of automated ultraviolet C–emitting device on decontamination of hospital rooms with and without real-time observation of terminal room disinfection

Katie Penno, Roman A. Jandarov, Madhuri M. Sopirala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background We studied the effectiveness of an ultraviolet C (UV-C) emitter in clinical settings and compared it with observed terminal disinfection. Methods We cultured 22 hospital discharge rooms at a tertiary care academic medical center. Phase 1 (unobserved terminal disinfection) included cultures of 11 high-touch environmental surfaces (HTSs) after terminal room disinfection (AD) and after the use of a UV-C–emitting device (AUV). Phase 2 (observed terminal disinfection) included cultures before terminal room disinfection (BD), AD, and AUV. Zero-inflated Poisson regression compared mean colony forming units (CFU) between the groups. Two-sample proportion tests identified significance of the observed differences in proportions of thoroughly cleaned HTSs (CFU < 5). Significant P value was determined using the Bonferroni corrected threshold of α =.05/12 =.004. Results We obtained 594 samples. Risk of overall contamination was 0.48 times lower in the AUV group than in the AD group (P <.001), with 1.04 log10 reduction. During phase 1, overall proportion of HTSs with <5 CFUs increased in AUV versus AD by 0.12 (P =.001). During phase 2, it increased in AD versus BD by 0.45 (P <.001), with no significant difference between AD and AUV (P =.02). Conclusions Use of UV-C with standard cleaning significantly reduced microbial burden and improved the thoroughness of terminal disinfection. We found no further benefit to UV-C use if standard terminal disinfection was observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1208-1213
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume45
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Decontamination
Disinfection
Observation
Equipment and Supplies
Touch
Stem Cells
Tertiary Healthcare

Keywords

  • Observed terminal cleaning
  • Terminal cleaning
  • Terminal disinfection
  • Ultraviolet
  • UV
  • UV-C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Effect of automated ultraviolet C–emitting device on decontamination of hospital rooms with and without real-time observation of terminal room disinfection",
abstract = "Background We studied the effectiveness of an ultraviolet C (UV-C) emitter in clinical settings and compared it with observed terminal disinfection. Methods We cultured 22 hospital discharge rooms at a tertiary care academic medical center. Phase 1 (unobserved terminal disinfection) included cultures of 11 high-touch environmental surfaces (HTSs) after terminal room disinfection (AD) and after the use of a UV-C–emitting device (AUV). Phase 2 (observed terminal disinfection) included cultures before terminal room disinfection (BD), AD, and AUV. Zero-inflated Poisson regression compared mean colony forming units (CFU) between the groups. Two-sample proportion tests identified significance of the observed differences in proportions of thoroughly cleaned HTSs (CFU < 5). Significant P value was determined using the Bonferroni corrected threshold of α =.05/12 =.004. Results We obtained 594 samples. Risk of overall contamination was 0.48 times lower in the AUV group than in the AD group (P <.001), with 1.04 log10 reduction. During phase 1, overall proportion of HTSs with <5 CFUs increased in AUV versus AD by 0.12 (P =.001). During phase 2, it increased in AD versus BD by 0.45 (P <.001), with no significant difference between AD and AUV (P =.02). Conclusions Use of UV-C with standard cleaning significantly reduced microbial burden and improved the thoroughness of terminal disinfection. We found no further benefit to UV-C use if standard terminal disinfection was observed.",
keywords = "Observed terminal cleaning, Terminal cleaning, Terminal disinfection, Ultraviolet, UV, UV-C",
author = "Katie Penno and Jandarov, {Roman A.} and Sopirala, {Madhuri M.}",
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T1 - Effect of automated ultraviolet C–emitting device on decontamination of hospital rooms with and without real-time observation of terminal room disinfection

AU - Penno, Katie

AU - Jandarov, Roman A.

AU - Sopirala, Madhuri M.

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - Background We studied the effectiveness of an ultraviolet C (UV-C) emitter in clinical settings and compared it with observed terminal disinfection. Methods We cultured 22 hospital discharge rooms at a tertiary care academic medical center. Phase 1 (unobserved terminal disinfection) included cultures of 11 high-touch environmental surfaces (HTSs) after terminal room disinfection (AD) and after the use of a UV-C–emitting device (AUV). Phase 2 (observed terminal disinfection) included cultures before terminal room disinfection (BD), AD, and AUV. Zero-inflated Poisson regression compared mean colony forming units (CFU) between the groups. Two-sample proportion tests identified significance of the observed differences in proportions of thoroughly cleaned HTSs (CFU < 5). Significant P value was determined using the Bonferroni corrected threshold of α =.05/12 =.004. Results We obtained 594 samples. Risk of overall contamination was 0.48 times lower in the AUV group than in the AD group (P <.001), with 1.04 log10 reduction. During phase 1, overall proportion of HTSs with <5 CFUs increased in AUV versus AD by 0.12 (P =.001). During phase 2, it increased in AD versus BD by 0.45 (P <.001), with no significant difference between AD and AUV (P =.02). Conclusions Use of UV-C with standard cleaning significantly reduced microbial burden and improved the thoroughness of terminal disinfection. We found no further benefit to UV-C use if standard terminal disinfection was observed.

AB - Background We studied the effectiveness of an ultraviolet C (UV-C) emitter in clinical settings and compared it with observed terminal disinfection. Methods We cultured 22 hospital discharge rooms at a tertiary care academic medical center. Phase 1 (unobserved terminal disinfection) included cultures of 11 high-touch environmental surfaces (HTSs) after terminal room disinfection (AD) and after the use of a UV-C–emitting device (AUV). Phase 2 (observed terminal disinfection) included cultures before terminal room disinfection (BD), AD, and AUV. Zero-inflated Poisson regression compared mean colony forming units (CFU) between the groups. Two-sample proportion tests identified significance of the observed differences in proportions of thoroughly cleaned HTSs (CFU < 5). Significant P value was determined using the Bonferroni corrected threshold of α =.05/12 =.004. Results We obtained 594 samples. Risk of overall contamination was 0.48 times lower in the AUV group than in the AD group (P <.001), with 1.04 log10 reduction. During phase 1, overall proportion of HTSs with <5 CFUs increased in AUV versus AD by 0.12 (P =.001). During phase 2, it increased in AD versus BD by 0.45 (P <.001), with no significant difference between AD and AUV (P =.02). Conclusions Use of UV-C with standard cleaning significantly reduced microbial burden and improved the thoroughness of terminal disinfection. We found no further benefit to UV-C use if standard terminal disinfection was observed.

KW - Observed terminal cleaning

KW - Terminal cleaning

KW - Terminal disinfection

KW - Ultraviolet

KW - UV

KW - UV-C

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