Effect of cell density and confluency on cholesterol metabolism in cancer cells in monolayer culture

D. Gal, P. C. MacDonald, J. C. Porter, J. W. Smith, E. R. Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cholesterol metabolism in four gynecological cancer cell lines in monolayer culture was evaluated as a function of cell density. The rate of uptake and degradation of [ 125I]iodinated low-density lipoprotein increased during the first 24 to 48 hr of culture, but decreased thereafter. Once the cells became confluent, the rate of metabolism of [ 125I]iodinated low-density lipoprotein was only one-tenth that in cells which were in the preconfluent state. The specific activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme reductase increased during the first 24 to 48 hr of culture and subsequently declined, reaching a nadir after confluency was attained. The rate of incorporation of [ 14C]oleate into cholesteryl esters was low when the cells were in the log-exponential phase of replication but increased gradually as cell density increased. The highest specific activity of acylcoenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase was attained after the cells became confluent. Generally speaking, there was an inverse relationship between the specific activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, on the one hand, and the rate of [ 125I]iodinated low-density lipoprotein metabolism and cholesteryl ester synthesis, on the other. It is concluded that cholesteryl metabolism in cancer cells in monolayer culture is regulated, in part, by the rate of cell division. In the cancer cells utilized in this study, it is apparent that cholesterol metabolism was subject to the same regulatory mechanisms as are present in nonneoplastic cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-477
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Research
Volume41
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1981

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Cell Count
Cholesterol
LDL Lipoproteins
Neoplasms
Cholesterol Esters
Oxidoreductases
Sterol O-Acyltransferase
Coenzymes
Oleic Acid
Cell Division
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Gal, D., MacDonald, P. C., Porter, J. C., Smith, J. W., & Simpson, E. R. (1981). Effect of cell density and confluency on cholesterol metabolism in cancer cells in monolayer culture. Cancer Research, 41(2), 473-477.

Effect of cell density and confluency on cholesterol metabolism in cancer cells in monolayer culture. / Gal, D.; MacDonald, P. C.; Porter, J. C.; Smith, J. W.; Simpson, E. R.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 41, No. 2, 1981, p. 473-477.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gal, D, MacDonald, PC, Porter, JC, Smith, JW & Simpson, ER 1981, 'Effect of cell density and confluency on cholesterol metabolism in cancer cells in monolayer culture', Cancer Research, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 473-477.
Gal D, MacDonald PC, Porter JC, Smith JW, Simpson ER. Effect of cell density and confluency on cholesterol metabolism in cancer cells in monolayer culture. Cancer Research. 1981;41(2):473-477.
Gal, D. ; MacDonald, P. C. ; Porter, J. C. ; Smith, J. W. ; Simpson, E. R. / Effect of cell density and confluency on cholesterol metabolism in cancer cells in monolayer culture. In: Cancer Research. 1981 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 473-477.
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