Effect of gemfibrozil ± niacin ± cholestyramine on endothelial function in patients with serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels < 160 mg/dl and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels < 40 mg/dl

Thomas C. Andrews, Edwin J. Whitney, Garfield Green, Robert Kalenian, Bradley E. Personius

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Abstract

We studied endothelial function using the brachial artery ultrasound model in 100 subjects from the Armed Forces Regression Study, a placebo- controlled, angiographic regression trial in subjects with normal or modestly elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and low levels of high- density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol treated for 30 months with gemfibrozil and (if necessary) niacin and/or cholestyramine to raise HDL by 25% and lower LDL to <110 mg/dl. Although the treatment group had highly significant improvements in LDL and HDL cholesterol, there was no difference between the 2 groups in flow-mediated dilation (treatment vs control 6.9 ± 6.5% vs 6.3 ± 7.3%) or nitroglycerin-induced dilation (12.4 ± 9.6% vs 11.9 ± 7.4%, all p = NS). Treatment and control subjects without a history of hypertension had flow-mediated dilation similar to that of a normal reference population (10.6 ± 8.3% vs 8.4 ± 4 5%), whereas subjects with a history of systemic hypertension had markedly impaired flow-mediated dilation that was not significantly improved with treatment (treatment vs control, 6.0 ± 5.5% vs 4.3 ± 5.9%, p = 0.2). Thus, nonhypertensive subjects with angiographic coronary disease and low HDL cholesterol had normal endothelial function in the brachial artery model. Patients with a history of hypertension had marked endothelial dysfunction despite blood pressure treated to normal levels, and this dysfunction is not attenuated by pharmacologic therapy for dyslipidemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-835
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume80
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1997

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Gemfibrozil
Cholestyramine Resin
Niacin
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Dilatation
Serum
Brachial Artery
Hypertension
LDL Lipoproteins
Therapeutics
Nitroglycerin
HDL Lipoproteins
Dyslipidemias
Coronary Disease
Placebos
Blood Pressure
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effect of gemfibrozil ± niacin ± cholestyramine on endothelial function in patients with serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels < 160 mg/dl and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels < 40 mg/dl. / Andrews, Thomas C.; Whitney, Edwin J.; Green, Garfield; Kalenian, Robert; Personius, Bradley E.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 80, No. 7, 01.10.1997, p. 831-835.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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