Effect of simulated microgravity exposure on thermoregulatory control of sweating.

D. Michikami, A. Kamiya, Qi Fu, Y. Niimi, S. Iwase, T. Mano, A. Suzumura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the alterations in thermoregulatory control following 14 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR). The threshold temperature for sweating onset and sweating sensitivity were determined from sweating rates on the chest and forearm, and tympanic temperature as an index of core temperature (Tc) in nine healthy males exposed to a 60-min heat stress with a water-perfused blanket before and after HDBR. The threshold temperature for sweating onset, that is, the Tc at which sweating began on the chest and forearm was 36.75 +/- 0.14 and 36.72 +/- 0.13 degrees C before HDBR, respectively. The value significantly increased to 37.05 +/- 0.09 (p<0.05) for the chest and 37.04 +/- 0.08 degrees C (p<0.05) for the forearm after HDBR. On the other hand, the sweating sensitivity which was indicated as a slope of the Tc-sweating rate relationship significantly decreased from 4.20 +/- 1.15 to 2.32 +/- 1.18 for the chest (p<0.05) and from 4.20 +/- 1.06 to 2.92 +/- 0.98 mg/min/cm2/degrees C for the forearm (p<0.05) after HDBR. These findings suggest that the heat-dissipatory function was attenuated after 14 days of HDBR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEnvironmental medicine : annual report of the Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University
Pages58-61
Number of pages4
Volume45
Edition2
StatePublished - 2001

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Weightlessness
Sweating
Bed Rest
Head
Forearm
Thorax
Temperature
Hot Temperature
Water

Cite this

Michikami, D., Kamiya, A., Fu, Q., Niimi, Y., Iwase, S., Mano, T., & Suzumura, A. (2001). Effect of simulated microgravity exposure on thermoregulatory control of sweating. In Environmental medicine : annual report of the Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University (2 ed., Vol. 45, pp. 58-61)

Effect of simulated microgravity exposure on thermoregulatory control of sweating. / Michikami, D.; Kamiya, A.; Fu, Qi; Niimi, Y.; Iwase, S.; Mano, T.; Suzumura, A.

Environmental medicine : annual report of the Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University. Vol. 45 2. ed. 2001. p. 58-61.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Michikami, D, Kamiya, A, Fu, Q, Niimi, Y, Iwase, S, Mano, T & Suzumura, A 2001, Effect of simulated microgravity exposure on thermoregulatory control of sweating. in Environmental medicine : annual report of the Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University. 2 edn, vol. 45, pp. 58-61.
Michikami D, Kamiya A, Fu Q, Niimi Y, Iwase S, Mano T et al. Effect of simulated microgravity exposure on thermoregulatory control of sweating. In Environmental medicine : annual report of the Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University. 2 ed. Vol. 45. 2001. p. 58-61
Michikami, D. ; Kamiya, A. ; Fu, Qi ; Niimi, Y. ; Iwase, S. ; Mano, T. ; Suzumura, A. / Effect of simulated microgravity exposure on thermoregulatory control of sweating. Environmental medicine : annual report of the Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University. Vol. 45 2. ed. 2001. pp. 58-61
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