Effectiveness and Safety Profile of Remote Pulmonary Artery Hemodynamic Monitoring in a “Real-World” Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

Gregory Paul Milligan, Nicole Minniefield, Bharath Raju, Nishi Patel, Katherine Michelis, Johanna Van Zyl, Daniel Cheeran, Amit Alam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Ambulatory hemodynamic monitoring has demonstrated the ability to reduce heart failure-related hospitalization, regardless of left ventricular ejection fraction; however, real-world data in a Veterans Affairs patient population are limited. The present study retrospectively reviewed 53 patients with New York Heart Association class III heart failure, regardless of left ventricular ejection fraction, implanted with a pulmonary artery pressure sensor (CardioMEMS) at our single Veterans Affairs institution. Heart failure-related hospitalizations were assessed in patients for 6 and 12 months after the implantation of the device and compared with the 6- and 12- month periods before implantation in the same patient cohort. Pulmonary arterial pressures and medication doses were also recorded at baseline, 6- months, and 12- months and procedural safety data were also assessed. Implantation of a remote pulmonary artery pressure sensor was associated with a 52% (95% confidence interval 30% to 68%, p <0.001) and a 44% (95% confidence interval 24% to 59%, p <0.001) reduction in heart failure-related hospitalization at 6 and 12 months after implant, respectively, compared with the 6- and 12-month preimplant periods. Mean pulmonary arterial pressures also demonstrated significant reductions from baseline to 6 and 12 months after implant. A total of 3 procedure-related adverse events were noted. In conclusion, pulmonary artery pressure sensor implantation is relatively safe and associated with significant reductions in heart failure-related hospitalization and decreased mean pulmonary artery pressures in patients within the Veterans Affairs system with New York Heart Association class III symptoms, regardless of ejection fraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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