Effectiveness of a 30-min CPR self-instruction program for lay responders: A controlled randomized study

Bonnie Lynch, Eric L. Einspruch, Graham Nichol, Lance B. Becker, Tom P. Aufderheide, Ahamed Idris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The length of current 4-h classes in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a barrier to widespread dissemination of CPR training. The effectiveness of video-based self-instruction (VSI) has been demonstrated in several studies; however, the effectiveness of this method with older adults is not certain. Although older adults are most likely to witness out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, these potential rescuers are underrepresented in traditional classes. We evaluated a VSI program that comprised a 22-min video, an inflatable training manikin, and an audio prompting device with individuals 40-70 years old. The hypotheses were that VSI results in performance of basic CPR skills superior to that of untrained learners and similar to that of learners in Heartsaver classes. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-five adults between 40 and 70 years old who had had no CPR training within the past 5 years were assigned to an untrained control group, Heartsaver training, or one of three versions of VSI. Basic CPR skills were measured by instructor assessment and by a sensored manikin. Results: The percentage of subjects who assessed unresponsiveness, called the emergency telephone number 911, provided adequate ventilation, proper hand placement, and adequate compression depth was significantly better (P < 0.05) for the VSI groups than for untrained controls. VSI subjects tended to have better overall performance and better ventilation performance than did Heartsaver subjects. Conclusions: Older adults learned the fundamental skills of CPR with this training program in about half an hour. If properly distributed, this type of training could produce a significant increase in the number of lay responders who can perform CPR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-43
Number of pages13
JournalResuscitation
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Programmed Instruction
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Manikins
Ventilation
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Control Groups
Telephone
Emergencies
Hand
Education
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Age
  • Bystander CPR
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Education
  • Out-of-hospital CPR
  • Witnessed cardiac arrest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Effectiveness of a 30-min CPR self-instruction program for lay responders : A controlled randomized study. / Lynch, Bonnie; Einspruch, Eric L.; Nichol, Graham; Becker, Lance B.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Idris, Ahamed.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 67, No. 1, 10.2005, p. 31-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lynch, Bonnie ; Einspruch, Eric L. ; Nichol, Graham ; Becker, Lance B. ; Aufderheide, Tom P. ; Idris, Ahamed. / Effectiveness of a 30-min CPR self-instruction program for lay responders : A controlled randomized study. In: Resuscitation. 2005 ; Vol. 67, No. 1. pp. 31-43.
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