Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with ergometric exercise as a countermeasure during simulated microgravity exposure in humans

Satoshi Iwase, Qi Fu, E. Moritomo, H. Takada, A. Kamiya, J. Kawanokuchi, T. Shiozawa, K. Hirayanagi, K. Iwasaki, K. Yajima, T. Mono

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To test the effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with ergometric exercise, 12 healthy young men (20.7 ±1.9 yrs) were exposed to simulated microgravity for 14 days of -6° head-down bedrest. Half the subjects were randomly selected and loaded 1.2 G artificial gravity with 60 W (four out of six subjects) or 40 W (two out of six subjects) of ergometric workload on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11. 12, 13, 14 (CM group). The rest of the subjects served as the control. Anti-G score, defined as the G-load × running time to the endpoint, was significantly elongated by the load of the centrifuge-ergometer. Plasma volume loss was suppressed (-5.0 ± 2.4 vs -16.4 ± 1.9 %), and fluid volume shift was prevented by the countermeasure load. Elevated heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity after bedrest were counteracted, and exaggerated response to head-up tilt was also suppressed. Centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with exercise is effective in preventing cardiovascular deconditioning due to microgravity exposure, however, an effective and appropriate regimen (magnitude of G-load and exercise workload) should be determined in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004
Pages1384-1391
Number of pages8
Volume3
StatePublished - 2004
EventInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: Oct 4 2004Oct 8 2004

Other

OtherInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period10/4/0410/8/04

Fingerprint

artificial gravity
centrifuges
countermeasures
Microgravity
Centrifuges
physical exercise
centrifuge
microgravity
Gravitation
gravity
ergometers
deconditioning
head up tilt
Exercise equipment
tilt
heart rate
Muscle
nerves
muscle
muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Iwase, S., Fu, Q., Moritomo, E., Takada, H., Kamiya, A., Kawanokuchi, J., ... Mono, T. (2004). Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with ergometric exercise as a countermeasure during simulated microgravity exposure in humans. In International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004 (Vol. 3, pp. 1384-1391)

Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with ergometric exercise as a countermeasure during simulated microgravity exposure in humans. / Iwase, Satoshi; Fu, Qi; Moritomo, E.; Takada, H.; Kamiya, A.; Kawanokuchi, J.; Shiozawa, T.; Hirayanagi, K.; Iwasaki, K.; Yajima, K.; Mono, T.

International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. Vol. 3 2004. p. 1384-1391.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Iwase, S, Fu, Q, Moritomo, E, Takada, H, Kamiya, A, Kawanokuchi, J, Shiozawa, T, Hirayanagi, K, Iwasaki, K, Yajima, K & Mono, T 2004, Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with ergometric exercise as a countermeasure during simulated microgravity exposure in humans. in International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. vol. 3, pp. 1384-1391, International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004, Vancouver, Canada, 10/4/04.
Iwase S, Fu Q, Moritomo E, Takada H, Kamiya A, Kawanokuchi J et al. Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with ergometric exercise as a countermeasure during simulated microgravity exposure in humans. In International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. Vol. 3. 2004. p. 1384-1391
Iwase, Satoshi ; Fu, Qi ; Moritomo, E. ; Takada, H. ; Kamiya, A. ; Kawanokuchi, J. ; Shiozawa, T. ; Hirayanagi, K. ; Iwasaki, K. ; Yajima, K. ; Mono, T. / Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity with ergometric exercise as a countermeasure during simulated microgravity exposure in humans. International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. Vol. 3 2004. pp. 1384-1391
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