Effects of aspirin on gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 and F content and on gastric mucosal injury in humans receiving fish oil or olive oil

Thomas W. Faust, Jan Stephen Redfern, Israel Podolsky, Edward Lee, Scott M Grundy, Mark Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 and F content was evaluated in healthy human subjects who received either fish oil or olive oil (control) daily for 3 wk before exposure to aspirin or no aspirin. Two hours after aspirin administration, when mean serum salicylate concentration was ~12 mg/dl, gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 and F content was reduced by > 95% in the fundus and antrum (p < 0.001) and there was endoscopic evidence of gastric mucosal damage (erosions, submucosal hemorrhages). Fish oil feeding had no significant effect on mucosal prostaglandin E2 or F content or on the damaging effect of aspirin on the stomach, despite the fact that fish oil reduced serum triglyceride concentrations significantly. These studies indicate that the damaging effects of aspirin on the gastric mucosa are not influenced by dietary fish oil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-591
Number of pages6
JournalGastroenterology
Volume98
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of aspirin on gastric mucosal prostaglandin E<sub>2</sub> and F<sub>2α</sub> content and on gastric mucosal injury in humans receiving fish oil or olive oil'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this