Effects of memory training on the subjective memory functioning and mental health of older adults: A meta-analysis

Mark Floyd, Forrest Scogin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effectiveness of memory training on the subjective memory functioning and mental health of older adults was examined in a meta-analysis. Effect sizes indicated that memory training led to improved subjective memory functioning (d++ = .19), but the magnitude of the improvement was less than that obtained on objective memory measures (d++ = .66) in the meta-analysis of P. Verhaeghen, A. Marcoen, and L. Goossens (1992). However, no differences in effectiveness were found among mnemonic training, expectancy modification, or placebo procedures such as unstructured practice. Improvement of subjective memory functioning was enhanced by including pretraining in skills such as the use of imagery and by including interventions to improve participants' attitudes toward the effects of aging on memory functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-161
Number of pages12
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1997

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Meta-Analysis
Mental Health
Learning
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Placebos

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Effects of memory training on the subjective memory functioning and mental health of older adults : A meta-analysis. / Floyd, Mark; Scogin, Forrest.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 12, No. 1, 03.1997, p. 150-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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