Effects of physiologic variations in temperature on the rate of antibiotic-induced bacterial killing

P. A. Mackowiak, A. E. Ruderman, R. M. Martin, W. J. Many, J. W. Smith, J. P. Luby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of physiologic temperature variations on antibiotic-induced killing of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were studied. At concentrations ≤ four times the minimal bactericidal concentration, the activity of each of the antibiotics (gentamicin sulfate, sodium ampicillin, and chlormaphenicol) against the test bacteria was influenced by changes in temperature. Only with S. pneumoniae did such influence appear to result directly from temperature-induced changes in the multiplication rate of the bacteria. Repeated subculturing of bacteria at 41°C to induce temperature adaptation had a variable effect on the rate of bacterial killing by appropriate antibiotics. The magnitude of the effects of temperature on antibiotic-induced rates of bacterial killing varies with the antibiotic class, the species of bacteria, and the temperature to which bacteria have been adapted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-62
Number of pages6
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of physiologic variations in temperature on the rate of antibiotic-induced bacterial killing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this