Effects of smaller tidal volumes during basic life support ventilation in patients with respiratory arrest: good ventilation, less risk?

Volker Wenzel, Christian Keller, Ahamed H. Idris, Volker Dörges, Karl H. Lindner, Joseph R. Brimacombe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: When ventilating an unintubated patient in cardiac or respiratory arrest, smaller tidal volumes of 500 ml instead of 800-1200 ml may be beneficial to decrease peak airway pressure, and to minimise stomach inflation. The purpose was to determine the effects of small (~500 ml) versus large (~1000 ml) tidal volumes given with paediatric versus adult self-inflatable bags and ~50% oxygen on respiratory parameters in patients during simulated basic life support ventilation. Methods: While undergoing induction of anaesthesia, patients were randomised to three minutes of ventilation with either an adult (n=40) or paediatric (n=40) self-inflatable bag. Results: When compared with an adult self-inflatable bag, the paediatric bag resulted in significantly lower mean (±standard deviation) exhaled tidal volume (365±55 versus 779±122 ml; P<0.0001), peak airway pressure (20±2 versus 25±5 cm H2O; P<0.0001), but comparable oxygen saturation (97±1% versus 98±1%; NS (nonsignificant)). Stomach inflation occurred in five of 40 patients ventilated with an adult self-inflatable bag, but in no patients who were ventilated with a paediatric self-inflatable bag (P=0.054). Conclusion: Administering smaller tidal volumes with a paediatric instead of an adult self-inflatable bag in unintubated adult patients with respiratory arrest maintains good oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination while decreasing peak airway pressure, which makes stomach inflation less likely. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-29
Number of pages5
JournalResuscitation
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

Keywords

  • Apnoea
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Peak airway pressure
  • Self-inflatable bag
  • Stomach inflation
  • Tidal volume
  • Unprotected airway

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of smaller tidal volumes during basic life support ventilation in patients with respiratory arrest: good ventilation, less risk?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this