Efficacy of glycolic acid peels in the treatment of Melasma

Mary E. Hurley, Ian L. Guevara, Rose Mary Gonzales, Amit G. Pandya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Melasma is an acquired hypermelanosis that is often recalcitrant to treatment with hypopigmenting agents. Objective: To assess the efficacy of 4% hydroquinone cream vs 4% hydroquinone cream combined with glycolic acid peels as treatment for melasma. Methods: Twenty-one Hispanic women with bilateral epidermal and mixed melasma were enrolled in a split-faced prospective trial lasting 8 weeks. Patients underwent 20% to 30% glycolic acid peels every 2 weeks to one side of the face only in addition to twice-daily fullface application of 4% hydroquinone cream and sun protective factor 25 UV-B sunscreen each morning. Pigmentation was measured objectively using a mexameter and the Melasma Area and Severity Index and subjectively using a linear analog scale and physician and patient global evaluation. Results: Hydroquinone treatment alone and treatment with the combination of hydroquinone and glycolic acid had a significant effect in reducing skin pigmentation compared with baseline (P<.001). However, no significant difference was found using combination therapy compared with hydroquinone alone (P=.75). Conclusions: Use of 4% hydroquinone and a daily sunscreen is effective in the treatment of melasma; however, the addition of 4 glycolic acid peels did not enhance the hypopigmenting effect of hydroquinone treatment alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1578-1582
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume138
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

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glycolic acid
Melanosis
Sunscreening Agents
Therapeutics
Skin Pigmentation
Hyperpigmentation
hydroquinone
Pigmentation
Solar System
Hispanic Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Hurley, M. E., Guevara, I. L., Gonzales, R. M., & Pandya, A. G. (2002). Efficacy of glycolic acid peels in the treatment of Melasma. Archives of Dermatology, 138(12), 1578-1582.

Efficacy of glycolic acid peels in the treatment of Melasma. / Hurley, Mary E.; Guevara, Ian L.; Gonzales, Rose Mary; Pandya, Amit G.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 138, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 1578-1582.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hurley, ME, Guevara, IL, Gonzales, RM & Pandya, AG 2002, 'Efficacy of glycolic acid peels in the treatment of Melasma', Archives of Dermatology, vol. 138, no. 12, pp. 1578-1582.
Hurley ME, Guevara IL, Gonzales RM, Pandya AG. Efficacy of glycolic acid peels in the treatment of Melasma. Archives of Dermatology. 2002 Dec 1;138(12):1578-1582.
Hurley, Mary E. ; Guevara, Ian L. ; Gonzales, Rose Mary ; Pandya, Amit G. / Efficacy of glycolic acid peels in the treatment of Melasma. In: Archives of Dermatology. 2002 ; Vol. 138, No. 12. pp. 1578-1582.
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