Efficacy of low-dose cholesterol-lowering drug therapy in men with moderate hypercholesterolemia

Margo A. Denke, Scott M Grundy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test the potency of low-dose cholesterol-lowering drug therapy in patients with moderate hypercholesterolemia and to evaluate the effectiveness for cholesterol lowering of a safe regimen to be used in primary prevention of coronary heart disease. Design: The efficacy of three drug regimens (cholestyramine resin, 8 g/d; cholestyramine resin, 8 g/d, plus lovastatin, 5 mg/d; and lovastatin, 20 mg/d) was tested in 26 men aged 31 to 70 years with moderate hypercholesterolemia after a Step-One cholesterol- lowering diet. Each drug period was 3 months in duration, interspersed by a 1-month period of the Step-One diet only. Blood for lipid and lipoprotein measurements was obtained on 5 different days during the last 2 weeks of each drug and diet-only period. Results: Cholestyramine resin therapy at 8 g/d achieved a significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels from 4.47 mmol/L (173 mg/dL) to 3.90 mmol/L (151 mg/dL) (P<.005). The addition of 5 mg of lovastatin to cholestyramine therapy achieved even lower levels, averaging 3.39 mmol/L (131 mg/dL) (P<.005). Lovastatin therapy at 20 mg/d produced lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels similar to that of the low-dose combination. Conclusions: Low-dose combination drug therapy for the management of hypercholesterolemia appears to be an effective means of lowering cholesterol levels that remain persistently elevated after dietary therapy; at the same time, it should carry a low risk of toxic effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-399
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume155
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 27 1995

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Cholestyramine Resin
Lovastatin
Hypercholesterolemia
Cholesterol
Drug Therapy
Diet
LDL Cholesterol
Medication Therapy Management
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Poisons
Primary Prevention
Therapeutics
Combination Drug Therapy
Lipoproteins
Coronary Disease
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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Efficacy of low-dose cholesterol-lowering drug therapy in men with moderate hypercholesterolemia. / Denke, Margo A.; Grundy, Scott M.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 155, No. 4, 27.02.1995, p. 393-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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