Efficiency of General Estimating Equations Estimators of Slopes in Repeated Measurements

Adding Subjects or Adding Measurements?

Chul Ahn, Sin Ho Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In controlled clinical trials, subjects are often evaluated at baseline and intervals across a treatment period. In most trials, the treatment period and the number of time points are predetermined by design. When the primary goal is to estimate and compare the rate of change in outcome variables over time, investigators are often confronted with difficult decisions of maintaining a balance between increasing the number of study subjects and increasing the number of measurements for each subject. In this paper, we present a method to evaluate the relative benefit of adding subjects versus adding measurements in terms of the efficiency of the general estimating equation (GEE) estimator of slope coefficients in repeated measurements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-316
Number of pages8
JournalDrug Information Journal
Volume37
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2003

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Controlled Clinical Trials
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Keywords

  • Autoregressive (1)
  • Compound symmetry
  • General estimating equation (GEE)
  • Slope

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Drug guides
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Efficiency of General Estimating Equations Estimators of Slopes in Repeated Measurements : Adding Subjects or Adding Measurements? / Ahn, Chul; Jung, Sin Ho.

In: Drug Information Journal, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2003, p. 309-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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