Emergency department visits in children with hemophilia

Bülent Özgönenel, Ayesha Zia, Michael U. Callaghan, Meera Chitlur, Madhvi Rajpurkar, Jeanne M. Lusher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The pediatric emergency department (ED) management of bleeding and other complications of hemophilia constitutes an increasingly important component of hemophilia therapy. This retrospective study examined the overall ED use by children with hemophilia in a single center, with a particular aim to investigate visits related to injury or bleeding, and those related to blood stream infection in patients with a central venous catheter (CVC). Methods: Electronic medical records of patients with hemophilia presenting to Children's Hospital of Michigan ED were reviewed. Different categories of ED visits over a 5-year period (January 2006-December 2010) were examined. Results: There were 536 ED visits from 84 male patients (median age 4 years, range 0-21) with hemophilia over the 5-year period. The reasons for ED visits were: injury or bleeding (61.2%); suspected CVC-related infection (11.8%); causes unrelated to hemophilia (19.2%); and routine clotting factor infusion (7.8%). Eighteen visits from six patients were secondary to injury or bleeding in a patient not yet diagnosed with hemophilia. An intracranial hemorrhage was detected in five visits. Overall, 5.4% of all visits represented distinct episodes of bloodstream infection. Conclusion: The pediatric ED is an indispensable component of the overall hemophilia care, because: (1) patients with potentially lethal problems such as ICH or CVC-related infection may present to the ED for their initial management; (2) previously undiagnosed patients with hemophilia may also present to the ED for their first bleeding episodes, initiating the diagnostic investigations; (3) the ED provides after-hours treatment service for many episodes of injury or bleeding, and also for clotting factor infusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1188-1191
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume60
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Hemophilia A
Hospital Emergency Service
Hemorrhage
Central Venous Catheters
Catheter-Related Infections
Blood Coagulation Factors
Wounds and Injuries
Pediatrics
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Electronic Health Records
Infection
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Catheter-related infections
  • Emergency department
  • Hemophilia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology

Cite this

Özgönenel, B., Zia, A., Callaghan, M. U., Chitlur, M., Rajpurkar, M., & Lusher, J. M. (2013). Emergency department visits in children with hemophilia. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 60(7), 1188-1191. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.24401

Emergency department visits in children with hemophilia. / Özgönenel, Bülent; Zia, Ayesha; Callaghan, Michael U.; Chitlur, Meera; Rajpurkar, Madhvi; Lusher, Jeanne M.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 60, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 1188-1191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Özgönenel, B, Zia, A, Callaghan, MU, Chitlur, M, Rajpurkar, M & Lusher, JM 2013, 'Emergency department visits in children with hemophilia', Pediatric Blood and Cancer, vol. 60, no. 7, pp. 1188-1191. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.24401
Özgönenel B, Zia A, Callaghan MU, Chitlur M, Rajpurkar M, Lusher JM. Emergency department visits in children with hemophilia. Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2013 Jul;60(7):1188-1191. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.24401
Özgönenel, Bülent ; Zia, Ayesha ; Callaghan, Michael U. ; Chitlur, Meera ; Rajpurkar, Madhvi ; Lusher, Jeanne M. / Emergency department visits in children with hemophilia. In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 60, No. 7. pp. 1188-1191.
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