Emergent Orthotopic Liver Transplantation for Hemorrhage from a Giant Cavernous Hepatic Hemangioma: Case Report and Review

Parsia A. Vagefi, Ingo Klein, Bruce Gelb, Bilal Hameed, Stephen L. Moff, Jeff P. Simko, Oren K. Fix, Helge Eilers, John R. Feiner, Nancy L. Ascher, Chris E. Freise, Nathan M. Bass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Cavernous hemangiomas represent the most common benign primary hepatic neoplasm, often being incidentally detected. Although the majority of hepatic hemangiomas remain asymptomatic, symptomatic hepatic hemangiomas can present with abdominal pain, hemorrhage, biliary compression, or a consumptive coagulopathy. The optimal surgical management of symptomatic hepatic hemangiomas remains controversial, with resection, enucleation, and both deceased donor and living donor liver transplantation having been reported. Case Report: We report the case of a patient found to have a unique syndrome of multiorgan cavernous hemangiomatosis involving the liver, lung, omentum, and spleen without cutaneous involvement. Sixteen years following her initial diagnosis, the patient suffered from intra-abdominal hemorrhage due to her giant cavernous hepatic hemangioma. Evidence of continued bleeding, in the setting of Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome and worsening abdominal compartment syndrome, prompted MELD exemption listing. The patient subsequently underwent emergent liver transplantation without complication. Conclusion: Although cavernous hemangiomas represent the most common benign primary hepatic neoplasm, hepatic hemangioma rupture remains a rare presentation in these patients. Management at a center with expertise in liver transplantation is warranted for those patients presenting with worsening DIC or hemorrhage, given the potential for rapid clinical decompensation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-214
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cavernous Hemangioma
Liver Transplantation
Hemangioma
Hemorrhage
Liver
Liver Neoplasms
Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome
Intra-Abdominal Hypertension
Dacarbazine
Omentum
Living Donors
Abdominal Pain
Rupture
Spleen
Tissue Donors
Lung
Skin

Keywords

  • Hepatic hemangioma
  • Kasabach-Merritt syndrome
  • Liver transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Emergent Orthotopic Liver Transplantation for Hemorrhage from a Giant Cavernous Hepatic Hemangioma : Case Report and Review. / Vagefi, Parsia A.; Klein, Ingo; Gelb, Bruce; Hameed, Bilal; Moff, Stephen L.; Simko, Jeff P.; Fix, Oren K.; Eilers, Helge; Feiner, John R.; Ascher, Nancy L.; Freise, Chris E.; Bass, Nathan M.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 209-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vagefi, PA, Klein, I, Gelb, B, Hameed, B, Moff, SL, Simko, JP, Fix, OK, Eilers, H, Feiner, JR, Ascher, NL, Freise, CE & Bass, NM 2011, 'Emergent Orthotopic Liver Transplantation for Hemorrhage from a Giant Cavernous Hepatic Hemangioma: Case Report and Review', Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 209-214. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11605-010-1248-1
Vagefi, Parsia A. ; Klein, Ingo ; Gelb, Bruce ; Hameed, Bilal ; Moff, Stephen L. ; Simko, Jeff P. ; Fix, Oren K. ; Eilers, Helge ; Feiner, John R. ; Ascher, Nancy L. ; Freise, Chris E. ; Bass, Nathan M. / Emergent Orthotopic Liver Transplantation for Hemorrhage from a Giant Cavernous Hepatic Hemangioma : Case Report and Review. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 209-214.
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