Emotional processing and self-control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

Amy E. Hughes, Cynthia A. Berg, Deborah J. Wiebe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective This study examined whether emotional processing (understanding emotions), self-control (regulation of thoughts, emotions, and behavior), and their interaction predicted HbA1c for adolescents with type 1 diabetes over and above diabetes-specific constructs. Methods Self-report measures of self-control, emotional processing, self-efficacy for diabetes management, diabetes-specific negative affect, and adherence, and HbA1c from medical records were obtained from 137 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (M age=13.48 years). Results Emotional processing interacted with self-control to predict HbA1c, such that when adolescents had both low emotional processing and low self-control, HbA1c was poorest. Also, both high emotional processing and self-control buffered negative effects of low capacity in the other in relation to HbA1c. The interaction of emotional processing×self-control predicted HbA1c over diabetes-specific self-efficacy, negative affect, and adherence. Conclusions These findings suggest the importance of emotional processing and self-control for health outcomes in adolescents with diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-934
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Self Efficacy
Emotions
Self-Control
Self Report
Medical Records
Health

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • diabetes management
  • emotional processing
  • self-control
  • self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Emotional processing and self-control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. / Hughes, Amy E.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Wiebe, Deborah J.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 8, 09.2012, p. 925-934.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hughes, Amy E. ; Berg, Cynthia A. ; Wiebe, Deborah J. / Emotional processing and self-control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 925-934.
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