Employee Job Satisfaction and Performance in Association with Workplace Responses to the 9/11 Attacks on New York City's World Trade Center

Adriana S. Miu, Anna J. Davis, Josh M. Raitt, Min Hyung Lee, Anthony Pedrazine, Fatih Canan, David E. Pollio, Carol S North

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective:Research is needed on disaster-affected workplaces, particularly on employee job satisfaction and performance, to inform workplace responses promoting employee postdisaster adjustment and wellbeing.Methods:Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from a volunteer sample of 255 employees of eight workplaces affected by the 9/11 attacks on New York City's World Trade Center nearly 3 years post disaster.Results:The effects of 9/11 on both job satisfaction and job performance were more negative than positive, especially for the Ground Zero employees. Effects on job satisfaction and job performance were generally congruent. Workplace responses focused on individual needs were perceived as positive and those focused on workplace needs as negative.Conclusions:Workplace responses focused on business improvement intended to improve workplace performance may not have the desired effect and may reduce employee job satisfaction and performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2022

Keywords

  • September 11 terrorist attacks
  • disaster
  • job performance
  • job satisfaction
  • workplace response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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