Establishing preference for lidocaine solution to water

Comparison between a fading and an abrupt-removal procedure for withdrawing a compound vehicle

J. L. Falk, E. Yosef, C. Kuo, P. Farooque, C. E. Lau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Rats were exposed to daily, 3-h, fixed-time 1-min food pellet delivery sessions, which is a procedure that produces overdrinking (schedule-induced polydipsia). In previous polydipsia studies, rats came to prefer solutions of drug or non-drug agents to concurrently presented water if the agents had first been offered in a glucose-saccharin vehicle that was slowly eliminated (faded), leaving a choice between a substance in water vehicle vs water. In the first experiment, a more rapid vehicle-fading procedure was used to produce a preference for 0.19 mg/ml lidocaine to water. In the second experiment, the vehicle was abruptly changed to water, which also resulted in a strong preference for lidocaine solution, although the lidocaine solution volumes ingested for the final sessions were significantly less than in the first experiment. The results are consistent with a conditioned flavor/nutrient preference interpretation for the institution of the lidocaine preference in both experiments. Although flavor/nutrient conditioning can be a sufficient condition for generating a substance preference, a previous experiment showed that it was not a necessary condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)803-808
Number of pages6
JournalBehavioural Pharmacology
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Lidocaine
Water
Polydipsia
Food
Saccharin
Appointments and Schedules
Glucose
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Associative history
  • Conditioned flavor preference
  • Drug preference
  • Lidocaine
  • Oral drug
  • Oral self-administration
  • Rat
  • Schedule-induced behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Establishing preference for lidocaine solution to water : Comparison between a fading and an abrupt-removal procedure for withdrawing a compound vehicle. / Falk, J. L.; Yosef, E.; Kuo, C.; Farooque, P.; Lau, C. E.

In: Behavioural Pharmacology, Vol. 10, No. 8, 01.01.1999, p. 803-808.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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