Evaluation of a shelter-based diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults

Darla E. Kendzor, Marlyn Allicock, Michael S. Businelle, Lona F. Sandon, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Summer G. Frank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The current study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of a diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults. Methods: Shelter residents (N = 32) were randomly assigned to a 4-week diet and physical activity intervention (n = 17) or an assessment-only control group (n = 15). Intervention participants received tailored educational newsletters, pedometers with step goals, and twice daily fruit/vegetable snacks. Key measures included 24-hour dietary recall interviews and accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Results: At baseline, 68.8% of participants were overweight or obese, 93.8% reported food insecurity, and 43.8% reported activity levels below physical activity guidelines. Baseline dietary recall interviews indicated low fruit/vegetable consumption, and elevated intake of added sugar, saturated fat, and sodium relative to current dietary recommendations. During the 4-week study period, intervention participants engaged in significantly greater accelerometer-measured daily MVPA (P < .001) than controls (median = 60 daily minutes p vs. 41 daily minutes). Between groups differences in fruit/vegetable consumption at the end of treatment did not reach statistical significance. Most participants reported that the intervention was helpful for increasing fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity. Conclusions: Findings highlight the potential to improve dietary quality and increase physical activity among sheltered homeless adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-97
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Vegetables
Fruit
Diet
Interviews
Snacks
Food Supply
Feasibility Studies
Sodium
Fats
Guidelines
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Accelerometry
  • Health disparities
  • Health promotion
  • Intervention study
  • Pedometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Evaluation of a shelter-based diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults. / Kendzor, Darla E.; Allicock, Marlyn; Businelle, Michael S.; Sandon, Lona F.; Pettee Gabriel, Kelley; Frank, Summer G.

In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 88-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kendzor, Darla E. ; Allicock, Marlyn ; Businelle, Michael S. ; Sandon, Lona F. ; Pettee Gabriel, Kelley ; Frank, Summer G. / Evaluation of a shelter-based diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults. In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 2017 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 88-97.
@article{ec43e115ebef4cb4b49968c77c9f2b42,
title = "Evaluation of a shelter-based diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults",
abstract = "Background: The current study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of a diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults. Methods: Shelter residents (N = 32) were randomly assigned to a 4-week diet and physical activity intervention (n = 17) or an assessment-only control group (n = 15). Intervention participants received tailored educational newsletters, pedometers with step goals, and twice daily fruit/vegetable snacks. Key measures included 24-hour dietary recall interviews and accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Results: At baseline, 68.8{\%} of participants were overweight or obese, 93.8{\%} reported food insecurity, and 43.8{\%} reported activity levels below physical activity guidelines. Baseline dietary recall interviews indicated low fruit/vegetable consumption, and elevated intake of added sugar, saturated fat, and sodium relative to current dietary recommendations. During the 4-week study period, intervention participants engaged in significantly greater accelerometer-measured daily MVPA (P < .001) than controls (median = 60 daily minutes p vs. 41 daily minutes). Between groups differences in fruit/vegetable consumption at the end of treatment did not reach statistical significance. Most participants reported that the intervention was helpful for increasing fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity. Conclusions: Findings highlight the potential to improve dietary quality and increase physical activity among sheltered homeless adults.",
keywords = "Accelerometry, Health disparities, Health promotion, Intervention study, Pedometry",
author = "Kendzor, {Darla E.} and Marlyn Allicock and Businelle, {Michael S.} and Sandon, {Lona F.} and {Pettee Gabriel}, Kelley and Frank, {Summer G.}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1123/jpah.2016-0343",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "88--97",
journal = "Journal of Physical Activity and Health",
issn = "1543-3080",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of a shelter-based diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults

AU - Kendzor, Darla E.

AU - Allicock, Marlyn

AU - Businelle, Michael S.

AU - Sandon, Lona F.

AU - Pettee Gabriel, Kelley

AU - Frank, Summer G.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Background: The current study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of a diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults. Methods: Shelter residents (N = 32) were randomly assigned to a 4-week diet and physical activity intervention (n = 17) or an assessment-only control group (n = 15). Intervention participants received tailored educational newsletters, pedometers with step goals, and twice daily fruit/vegetable snacks. Key measures included 24-hour dietary recall interviews and accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Results: At baseline, 68.8% of participants were overweight or obese, 93.8% reported food insecurity, and 43.8% reported activity levels below physical activity guidelines. Baseline dietary recall interviews indicated low fruit/vegetable consumption, and elevated intake of added sugar, saturated fat, and sodium relative to current dietary recommendations. During the 4-week study period, intervention participants engaged in significantly greater accelerometer-measured daily MVPA (P < .001) than controls (median = 60 daily minutes p vs. 41 daily minutes). Between groups differences in fruit/vegetable consumption at the end of treatment did not reach statistical significance. Most participants reported that the intervention was helpful for increasing fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity. Conclusions: Findings highlight the potential to improve dietary quality and increase physical activity among sheltered homeless adults.

AB - Background: The current study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of a diet and physical activity intervention for homeless adults. Methods: Shelter residents (N = 32) were randomly assigned to a 4-week diet and physical activity intervention (n = 17) or an assessment-only control group (n = 15). Intervention participants received tailored educational newsletters, pedometers with step goals, and twice daily fruit/vegetable snacks. Key measures included 24-hour dietary recall interviews and accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Results: At baseline, 68.8% of participants were overweight or obese, 93.8% reported food insecurity, and 43.8% reported activity levels below physical activity guidelines. Baseline dietary recall interviews indicated low fruit/vegetable consumption, and elevated intake of added sugar, saturated fat, and sodium relative to current dietary recommendations. During the 4-week study period, intervention participants engaged in significantly greater accelerometer-measured daily MVPA (P < .001) than controls (median = 60 daily minutes p vs. 41 daily minutes). Between groups differences in fruit/vegetable consumption at the end of treatment did not reach statistical significance. Most participants reported that the intervention was helpful for increasing fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity. Conclusions: Findings highlight the potential to improve dietary quality and increase physical activity among sheltered homeless adults.

KW - Accelerometry

KW - Health disparities

KW - Health promotion

KW - Intervention study

KW - Pedometry

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015953146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015953146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/jpah.2016-0343

DO - 10.1123/jpah.2016-0343

M3 - Article

C2 - 27775471

AN - SCOPUS:85015953146

VL - 14

SP - 88

EP - 97

JO - Journal of Physical Activity and Health

JF - Journal of Physical Activity and Health

SN - 1543-3080

IS - 2

ER -