Evaluation of hematuria and proteinuria: How should a pediatrician proceed?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Finding blood or protein in the urine of a patient can be the source of immense anxiety. The list of diseases that result in these findings is quite long. Thus, many pediatricians believe that an exhaustive investigation is necessary to be certain of the cause. The review will discuss the major causes of hematuria and proteinuria in the pediatric population, and discuss a rational approach to the evaluation of these conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: A number of recent studies have examined the results of mass screenings of school-age children and the final outcome of examination of children with hematuria and/or proteinuria. Most children with either isolated hematuria or isolated proteinuria had benign disease processes. Children with combined hematuria and proteinuria had a higher prevalence of significant kidney disease. SUMMARY: The urinalysis combined with the history and physical examination should indicate the cause of hematuria and proteinuria in most cases. Significant renal disease can be ruled out with a minimal amount of work-up in most patients. The presence of hematuria and proteinuria together significantly increases the likelihood of significant renal disease and should prompt a referral to a specialist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-144
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Hematuria
Proteinuria
Kidney
Mass Screening
Urinalysis
Kidney Diseases
Physical Examination
Pediatricians
Blood Proteins
Referral and Consultation
Anxiety
History
Urine
Pediatrics
Population

Keywords

  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Orthostatic proteinuria
  • Renal biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Evaluation of hematuria and proteinuria : How should a pediatrician proceed? / Quigley, Raymond.

In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Vol. 20, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 140-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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