Evaluation of Surgisis for patch repair of abdominal wall defects in children

Alana Beres, Emily R. Christison-Lagay, Rodrigo L P Romao, Jacob C. Langer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Abdominal wall defects in children are not always amenable to primary repair and may require a patch. The ideal material has yet to be established. We sought to evaluate our experience using the bioabsorbable material Surgisis (Cook Surgical, Bloomington, IN) for abdominal closure. Methods: A retrospective chart review of abdominal wall defects repaired with Surgisis in our institution from 2000 to 2010 was performed. Data extracted included cause of defect, age at operation, possibility of skin coverage, recurrence, length of follow-up, and rate of wound infection. Results: Thirteen patients were identified. Cause of defect was gastroschisis (n = 2), ventral hernia after diaphragmatic hernia repair (n = 2), and omphalocele (n = 9). At median follow-up of 60 months (range, 10-90), 5 (38%) of 13 patients recurred, and 1 patient recurred twice. All recurrences required subsequent patch closure. Six instances of wound infection required antibiotics. None required patch removal. There was a trend toward more frequent recurrence among infants undergoing patch repair (3/4 recurrences in this group) than neonates (1/4 recurrences) or children older than 18 months (1/5 recurrences). Conclusion: Our data suggest that Surgisis is moderately successful in the repair of pediatric abdominal wall defects. We noted a trend toward a higher recurrence rate in infants. Further studies investigating timing of repair and alternative biosynthetic materials are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-919
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

Fingerprint

Abdominal Wall
Recurrence
Wound Infection
Gastroschisis
Ventral Hernia
Umbilical Hernia
Diaphragmatic Hernia
Herniorrhaphy
surgisis
Newborn Infant
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Skin

Keywords

  • Abdominal wall defects
  • Gastroschisis
  • Omphalocoele
  • Porcine small intestinal submucosa
  • Ventral hernia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Evaluation of Surgisis for patch repair of abdominal wall defects in children. / Beres, Alana; Christison-Lagay, Emily R.; Romao, Rodrigo L P; Langer, Jacob C.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 47, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 917-919.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beres, Alana ; Christison-Lagay, Emily R. ; Romao, Rodrigo L P ; Langer, Jacob C. / Evaluation of Surgisis for patch repair of abdominal wall defects in children. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 47, No. 5. pp. 917-919.
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