Evaluation of the patient with silicone gel breast implants and rheumatic complaints

S. B. Cohen, R. J. Rohrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By utilizing a systematic approach to evaluate patients with implants and musculoskeletal complaints, patients can be categorized into either those with a true connective-tissue disease (scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogrens) or those with nonspecific muscle and joint findings consistent with fibromyalgia. This latter subgroup represents the majority of patients who present with musculoskeletal complaints and have no evidence of a serious connective-tissue disease. Patients with silicone gel breast implants suffer great anxiety and fear over the possible association of implants and disease. Unfortunately, most of the information provided to the patient is through the media, support groups, or the legal system. Many patients are unable to evaluate this issue in an objective fashion and present to the plastic surgeon convinced that the implants are causing their problems. Consultation with a rheumatologist interested in the silicone gel implant controversy would serve to educate the patient regarding the diagnosis, as well as provide an independent source of information regarding the relationship between implants and disease. Until proper case-control studies are performed, the controversy over silicone gel implants and connective-tissue disease will persist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-125
Number of pages6
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume94
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Silicone Gels
Breast Implants
Connective Tissue Diseases
Fibromyalgia
Self-Help Groups
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Fear
Case-Control Studies
Referral and Consultation
Anxiety
Joints
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Evaluation of the patient with silicone gel breast implants and rheumatic complaints. / Cohen, S. B.; Rohrich, R. J.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 94, No. 1, 1994, p. 120-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3bfc2f75e66a4d59b2b3e24c7b58fc25,
title = "Evaluation of the patient with silicone gel breast implants and rheumatic complaints",
abstract = "By utilizing a systematic approach to evaluate patients with implants and musculoskeletal complaints, patients can be categorized into either those with a true connective-tissue disease (scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogrens) or those with nonspecific muscle and joint findings consistent with fibromyalgia. This latter subgroup represents the majority of patients who present with musculoskeletal complaints and have no evidence of a serious connective-tissue disease. Patients with silicone gel breast implants suffer great anxiety and fear over the possible association of implants and disease. Unfortunately, most of the information provided to the patient is through the media, support groups, or the legal system. Many patients are unable to evaluate this issue in an objective fashion and present to the plastic surgeon convinced that the implants are causing their problems. Consultation with a rheumatologist interested in the silicone gel implant controversy would serve to educate the patient regarding the diagnosis, as well as provide an independent source of information regarding the relationship between implants and disease. Until proper case-control studies are performed, the controversy over silicone gel implants and connective-tissue disease will persist.",
author = "Cohen, {S. B.} and Rohrich, {R. J.}",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "120--125",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of the patient with silicone gel breast implants and rheumatic complaints

AU - Cohen, S. B.

AU - Rohrich, R. J.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - By utilizing a systematic approach to evaluate patients with implants and musculoskeletal complaints, patients can be categorized into either those with a true connective-tissue disease (scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogrens) or those with nonspecific muscle and joint findings consistent with fibromyalgia. This latter subgroup represents the majority of patients who present with musculoskeletal complaints and have no evidence of a serious connective-tissue disease. Patients with silicone gel breast implants suffer great anxiety and fear over the possible association of implants and disease. Unfortunately, most of the information provided to the patient is through the media, support groups, or the legal system. Many patients are unable to evaluate this issue in an objective fashion and present to the plastic surgeon convinced that the implants are causing their problems. Consultation with a rheumatologist interested in the silicone gel implant controversy would serve to educate the patient regarding the diagnosis, as well as provide an independent source of information regarding the relationship between implants and disease. Until proper case-control studies are performed, the controversy over silicone gel implants and connective-tissue disease will persist.

AB - By utilizing a systematic approach to evaluate patients with implants and musculoskeletal complaints, patients can be categorized into either those with a true connective-tissue disease (scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogrens) or those with nonspecific muscle and joint findings consistent with fibromyalgia. This latter subgroup represents the majority of patients who present with musculoskeletal complaints and have no evidence of a serious connective-tissue disease. Patients with silicone gel breast implants suffer great anxiety and fear over the possible association of implants and disease. Unfortunately, most of the information provided to the patient is through the media, support groups, or the legal system. Many patients are unable to evaluate this issue in an objective fashion and present to the plastic surgeon convinced that the implants are causing their problems. Consultation with a rheumatologist interested in the silicone gel implant controversy would serve to educate the patient regarding the diagnosis, as well as provide an independent source of information regarding the relationship between implants and disease. Until proper case-control studies are performed, the controversy over silicone gel implants and connective-tissue disease will persist.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028100761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028100761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 94

SP - 120

EP - 125

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 1

ER -