Evasion and disruption of innate immune signalling by hepatitis C and West Nile viruses

Mehul S. Suthar, Michael Gale, David M. Owen

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Signalling pathways leading to type I interferon production are the first line of defence employed by the host to combat viruses, and represent a barrier that an invading virus must overcome in order to establish infection. In this review we highlight the ability of two members of the Flaviviridae, a globally distributed family of RNA viruses that represent a significant public health concern, to disrupt and evade these defences. Hepatitis C virus is a hepatotropic virus, infecting greater than 170 million people worldwide, while West Nile virus is a neurotropic virus that causes encephalitis in humans and horses. While these viruses cause distinct disease phenotypes, the ability of pathogenic strains to modulate the innate immune response is a key factor in influencing disease outcome. Both viruses have evolved unique strategies to target various aspects of type I interferon induction and signalling in order to prevent viral clearance and to promote virus replication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)880-888
Number of pages9
JournalCellular Microbiology
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 14 2009

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West Nile virus
Hepatitis C
Viruses
Interferon Type I
Encephalitis Viruses
Flaviviridae
RNA Viruses
Virus Replication
Innate Immunity
Hepacivirus
Horses
Public Health
Phenotype
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Evasion and disruption of innate immune signalling by hepatitis C and West Nile viruses. / Suthar, Mehul S.; Gale, Michael; Owen, David M.

In: Cellular Microbiology, Vol. 11, No. 6, 14.05.2009, p. 880-888.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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