Events at the host-microbial interface of the gastrointestinal tract III. Cell-to-cell signaling among microbial flora, host, and pathogens: There is a whole lot of talking going on

Marcie B. Clarke, Vanessa Sperandio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Humans have an important association with their intestinal microbial flora. The microbial flora helps to shape the mammalian innate immune system, absorbs nutrients, and plays an intricate role on intestinal development. Microbes and mammals communicate with each other through an array of hormone and hormonelike chemical compounds. These "signals," however, are hijacked by bacterial pathogens, such as enterohemorrhagic Eschrichia coli (EHEC), to activate its virulence genes, colonize the host, and start the disease process. This review explores the cell-to-cell signaling events in the gastrointestinal tract that lead EHEC to regulate its virulence genes in a coordinate manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume288
Issue number6 51-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Virulence
Gastrointestinal Tract
Genes
Mammals
Immune System
Hormones
Food
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

Keywords

  • Autoinducer
  • Enterohemorrahagil Escherichia coli
  • Epinephrine
  • Hormones
  • Prokaryote
  • Quorum sensing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology

Cite this

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