Evidence for maternal diet-mediated effects on the offspring microbiome and immunity: implications for public health initiatives

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract: Diets rich in saturated fats have become a staple globally. Fifty percent of women of childbearing age in the United States are obese or overweight, with diet being a significant contributor. There is increasing evidence of the impact of maternal high-fat diet on the offspring microbiome. Alterations of the neonatal microbiome have been shown to be associated with multiple morbidities, including the development of necrotizing enterocolitis, atopy, asthma, metabolic dysfunction, and hypertension among others. This review provides an overview of the recent studies and mechanisms being examined on how maternal diet can alter the immune response and microbiome in offspring and the implications for directed public health initiatives for women of childbearing age. Impact: Maternal diet is important in shaping the offspring microbiome and neonatal immune system.Reviews the current literature in the field and suggests potential mechanisms and areas of research to be targeted.Highlights the current scope of our knowledge of ideal nutrition during pregnancy and consideration for enhanced public health initiatives to promote well-being of the future generation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-306
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Research
Volume89
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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