Abstract

The objective of this retrospective data analysis was to test the hypothesis that absorptive hypercalciuria Type II (AH-II) is a less severe variant of absorptive hypercalciuria Type I (AH-I), a common cause of calcareous stones. 24-h urinary calcium obtained on constant metabolic diets was retrieved from several data sources, including those of the authors and another group. On a low calcium diet (10 mmol calcium), 35 patients with AH-II were compared with 70 non-stone formers (NSF) and 76 patients with AH-I. On a high calcium diet (25 mmol calcium/day), 10 patients with AH-II were compared with 35 NSF and 32 with AH-I. On a low calcium diet for all participants, 24-h urinary calcium in AH-II (4.13 ± 0.63 mmol/day) was significantly higher than in NSF (3.06 ± 1.17 mmol/day), but significantly lower than in AH-I (6.11 ± 1.14 mmol/day) (p < 0.001). In a smaller subset, fractional intestinal calcium absorption in AH-II (65.0 ± 11.1%) was intermediate between NSF (50.0 ± 6.4%) and AH-I (71.0 ± 6.7%) (p < 0.001 between AH-II and other groups). On a high calcium diet, the rise in urinary calcium in AH-II was significantly higher than in NSF, but not as marked as in AH-I. Estimated calcium balance in AH-II was similar to NSF, but significantly more positive than AH-I. In conclusion, AH-II shares with AH-I the same metabolic disturbance(s) stimulating intestinal absorption and renal excretion of calcium but to a lesser degree. Bone might be spared in AH-II.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-152
Number of pages6
JournalUrological Research
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Hypercalciuria
Calcium
Diet
Intestinal Absorption
Information Storage and Retrieval

Keywords

  • Absorptive hypercalciuria
  • Hypercalciuria
  • Urolithiasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Evidence for metabolic origin of absorptive hypercalciuria Type II. / Pak, Charles Y; Pearle, Margaret S; Sakhaee, Khashayar.

In: Urological Research, Vol. 39, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 147-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The objective of this retrospective data analysis was to test the hypothesis that absorptive hypercalciuria Type II (AH-II) is a less severe variant of absorptive hypercalciuria Type I (AH-I), a common cause of calcareous stones. 24-h urinary calcium obtained on constant metabolic diets was retrieved from several data sources, including those of the authors and another group. On a low calcium diet (10 mmol calcium), 35 patients with AH-II were compared with 70 non-stone formers (NSF) and 76 patients with AH-I. On a high calcium diet (25 mmol calcium/day), 10 patients with AH-II were compared with 35 NSF and 32 with AH-I. On a low calcium diet for all participants, 24-h urinary calcium in AH-II (4.13 ± 0.63 mmol/day) was significantly higher than in NSF (3.06 ± 1.17 mmol/day), but significantly lower than in AH-I (6.11 ± 1.14 mmol/day) (p < 0.001). In a smaller subset, fractional intestinal calcium absorption in AH-II (65.0 ± 11.1{\%}) was intermediate between NSF (50.0 ± 6.4{\%}) and AH-I (71.0 ± 6.7{\%}) (p < 0.001 between AH-II and other groups). On a high calcium diet, the rise in urinary calcium in AH-II was significantly higher than in NSF, but not as marked as in AH-I. Estimated calcium balance in AH-II was similar to NSF, but significantly more positive than AH-I. In conclusion, AH-II shares with AH-I the same metabolic disturbance(s) stimulating intestinal absorption and renal excretion of calcium but to a lesser degree. Bone might be spared in AH-II.",
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