Evolutionary paths to antibiotic resistance under dynamically sustained drug selection

Erdal Toprak, Adrian Veres, Jean Baptiste Michel, Remy Chait, Daniel L. Hartl, Roy Kishony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

325 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibiotic resistance can evolve through the sequential accumulation of multiple mutations1. To study such gradual evolution, we developed a selection device, the 'morbidostat', that continuously monitors bacterial growth and dynamically regulates drug concentrations, such that the evolving population is constantly challenged 2-5. We analyzed the evolution of resistance in Escherichia coli under selection with single drugs, including chloramphenicol, doxycycline and trimethoprim. Over a period of ∼ 20 days, resistance levels increased dramatically, with parallel populations showing similar phenotypic trajectories. Whole-genome sequencing of the evolved strains identified mutations both specific to resistance to a particular drug and shared in resistance to multiple drugs. Chloramphenicol and doxycycline resistance evolved smoothly through diverse combinations of mutations in genes involved in translation, transcription and transport 3. In contrast, trimethoprim resistance evolved in a stepwise manner 1,6, through mutations restricted to the gene encoding the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) 7,8. Sequencing of DHFR over the time course of the experiment showed that parallel populations evolved similar mutations and acquired them in a similar order 9.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-105
Number of pages5
JournalNature Genetics
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Microbial Drug Resistance
Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase
Mutation
Doxycycline
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Trimethoprim Resistance
Chloramphenicol Resistance
Population
Trimethoprim
Multiple Drug Resistance
Chloramphenicol
Genes
Genome
Escherichia coli
Equipment and Supplies
Enzymes
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Toprak, E., Veres, A., Michel, J. B., Chait, R., Hartl, D. L., & Kishony, R. (2012). Evolutionary paths to antibiotic resistance under dynamically sustained drug selection. Nature Genetics, 44(1), 101-105. https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.1034

Evolutionary paths to antibiotic resistance under dynamically sustained drug selection. / Toprak, Erdal; Veres, Adrian; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Chait, Remy; Hartl, Daniel L.; Kishony, Roy.

In: Nature Genetics, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 101-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Toprak, E, Veres, A, Michel, JB, Chait, R, Hartl, DL & Kishony, R 2012, 'Evolutionary paths to antibiotic resistance under dynamically sustained drug selection', Nature Genetics, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 101-105. https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.1034
Toprak, Erdal ; Veres, Adrian ; Michel, Jean Baptiste ; Chait, Remy ; Hartl, Daniel L. ; Kishony, Roy. / Evolutionary paths to antibiotic resistance under dynamically sustained drug selection. In: Nature Genetics. 2012 ; Vol. 44, No. 1. pp. 101-105.
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