Examination of risk and resiliency in a pediatric sickle cell disease population using the psychosocial assessment tool 2.0

Cynthia W. Karlson, Stacey Leist-Haynes, Maria Smith, Melissa A. Faith, T. David Elkin, Gail Megason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the Psychosocial Assessment Tool 2.0 (PAT) as an appropriate screening measure of risk for patient and family psychological distress in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods 219 caregivers completed the PAT during regular hematology clinic visits. Confirmatory factor analysis and tests of reliability were conducted. Multilevel modeling examined change and predictors of risk scores across four assessments. Results Confirmatory factor analysis factor loadings ranged from. 03 to. 81, and reliability coefficients ranged from. 43 to. 83. Risk for patient and sibling emotional problems, family problems, and parent stress reaction decreased over time. Increased patient age, chronic blood transfusion, lower caregiver education, caregivers being divorced, fewer adults and more children in the home, and greater financial difficulties were independent predictors of psychosocial risk. Conclusions Results suggest that the PAT has utility in a pediatric sickle cell disease sample. Most caregivers reported low distress and high resiliency factors in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1031-1040
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Sickle Cell Anemia
Caregivers
Pediatrics
Population
Statistical Factor Analysis
Divorce
Hematology
Ambulatory Care
Blood Transfusion
Siblings
Psychology
Education

Keywords

  • caregiver
  • longitudinal
  • psychosocial adjustment
  • risk factors
  • sibling
  • sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Examination of risk and resiliency in a pediatric sickle cell disease population using the psychosocial assessment tool 2.0. / Karlson, Cynthia W.; Leist-Haynes, Stacey; Smith, Maria; Faith, Melissa A.; Elkin, T. David; Megason, Gail.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 9, 10.2012, p. 1031-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Karlson, Cynthia W. ; Leist-Haynes, Stacey ; Smith, Maria ; Faith, Melissa A. ; Elkin, T. David ; Megason, Gail. / Examination of risk and resiliency in a pediatric sickle cell disease population using the psychosocial assessment tool 2.0. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 9. pp. 1031-1040.
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