Exertional fatigue in disorders of muscle

Jonathan S. Friedland, David J. Paterson, Ronald G. Haller, Steven F. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

To the Editor: In his editorial (Feb. 7 issue)1 Layzer concludes that little is known about the biochemistry of exercise-induced muscle fatigue. It is now becoming apparent, however, that such fatigue may be influenced by local and systemic potassium concentrations. There is a well-recognized association between muscle fatigue and hyperkalemia that is supported by the observation that beta-blocking agents may cause fatigue2 and enhance exercise-induced hyperkalemia.3 Strenuous exercise on a cycle ergometer (approximately 350 W) results in a rapid increase in arterial plasma potassium concentrations, which peak at about 7 mmol per liter after about one minute,4 coinciding with the. .

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1896-1897
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume324
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 1991

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Muscle Fatigue
Muscular Diseases
Fatigue
Potassium
Hyperkalemia
Biochemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Exertional fatigue in disorders of muscle. / Friedland, Jonathan S.; Paterson, David J.; Haller, Ronald G.; Lewis, Steven F.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 324, No. 26, 27.06.1991, p. 1896-1897.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Friedland, JS, Paterson, DJ, Haller, RG & Lewis, SF 1991, 'Exertional fatigue in disorders of muscle', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 324, no. 26, pp. 1896-1897. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199106273242617
Friedland, Jonathan S. ; Paterson, David J. ; Haller, Ronald G. ; Lewis, Steven F. / Exertional fatigue in disorders of muscle. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 324, No. 26. pp. 1896-1897.
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