Exo1 plays a major role in DNA end resection in humans and influences double-strand break repair and damage signaling decisions

Nozomi Tomimatsu, Bipasha Mukherjee, Katherine Deland, Akihiro Kurimasa, Emma Bolderson, Kum Kum Khanna, Sandeep Burma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The resection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to generate ssDNA tails is a pivotal event in the cellular response to these breaks. In the two-step model of resection, primarily elucidated in yeast, initial resection by Mre11-CtIP is followed by extensive resection by two distinct pathways involving Exo1 or BLM/WRN-Dna2. However, resection pathways and their exact contributions in humans in vivo are not as clearly worked out as in yeast. Here, we examined the contribution of Exo1 to DNA end resection in humans in vivo in response to ionizing radiation (IR) and its relationship with other resection pathways (Mre11-CtIP or BLM/WRN). We find that Exo1 plays a predominant role in resection in human cells along with an alternate pathway dependent on WRN. While Mre11 and CtIP stimulate resection in human cells, they are not absolutely required for this process and Exo1 can function in resection even in the absence of Mre11-CtIP. Interestingly, the recruitment of Exo1 to DNA breaks appears to be inhibited by the NHEJ protein Ku80, and the higher level of resection that occurs upon siRNA-mediated depletion of Ku80 is dependent on Exo1. In addition, Exo1 may be regulated by 53BP1 and Brca1, and the restoration of resection in BRCA1-deficient cells upon depletion of 53BP1 is dependent on Exo1. Finally, we find that Exo1-mediated resection facilitates a transition from ATM- to ATR-mediated cell cycle checkpoint signaling. Our results identify Exo1 as a key mediator of DNA end resection and DSB repair and damage signaling decisions in human cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-448
Number of pages8
JournalDNA Repair
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Repair
Cells
DNA
Yeast
Yeasts
Ionizing radiation
Automatic teller machines
DNA Breaks
Double-Stranded DNA Breaks
Small Interfering RNA
Restoration
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Ionizing Radiation
Tail
Proteins

Keywords

  • ATR ATM
  • DNA damage response
  • DNA end resection
  • DNA repair
  • Exo1
  • Homologous recombination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Exo1 plays a major role in DNA end resection in humans and influences double-strand break repair and damage signaling decisions. / Tomimatsu, Nozomi; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Deland, Katherine; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Bolderson, Emma; Khanna, Kum Kum; Burma, Sandeep.

In: DNA Repair, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.04.2012, p. 441-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tomimatsu, Nozomi ; Mukherjee, Bipasha ; Deland, Katherine ; Kurimasa, Akihiro ; Bolderson, Emma ; Khanna, Kum Kum ; Burma, Sandeep. / Exo1 plays a major role in DNA end resection in humans and influences double-strand break repair and damage signaling decisions. In: DNA Repair. 2012 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 441-448.
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