Expanding clinical phenotype in CACNA1C related disorders: From neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy to late-onset epilepsy

Xiuhua Bozarth, Jennifer N. Dines, Qian Cong, Ghayda M. Mirzaa, Kimberly Foss, J. Lawrence Merritt, Jenny Thies, Heather C. Mefford, Edward Novotny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

CACNA1C (NM_000719.6) encodes an L-type calcium voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca v 1.2), and pathogenic variants have been associated with two distinct clinical entities: Timothy syndrome and Brugada syndrome. Thus far, CACNA1C has not been reported as a gene associated with epileptic encephalopathy and is less commonly associated with epilepsy. We report three individuals from two families with variants in CACNA1C. Patient 1 presented with neonatal onset epileptic encephalopathy (NOEE) and was found to have a de novo missense variant in CACNA1C (c.4087G>A (p.V1363M)) on exome sequencing. In Family 2, Patient 2 presented with congenital cardiac anomalies and cardiomyopathy and was found to have a paternally inherited splice site variant, c.3717+1_3717+2insA, on a cardiomyopathy panel. Her father, Patient 3, presented with learning difficulties, late-onset epilepsy, and congenital cardiac anomalies. Family 2 highlights variable expressivity seen within a family. This case series expands the clinical and molecular phenotype of CACNA1C-related disorders and highlights the need to include CACNA1C on epilepsy gene panels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2733-2739
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A
Volume176
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • CACNA1C
  • electroencephalogram
  • epileptic encephalopathy
  • exome sequencing
  • neonatal onset epileptic encephalopathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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