Experience performing 64 consecutive stapled intestinal anastomoses in small children and infants

Ian C S Mitchell, Robert Barber, Anne C. Fischer, David T. Schindel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Purpose: Intestinal anastomosis in children has traditionally been performed using hand-sewn techniques. Little data exist evaluating the efficacy of stapled intestinal anastomoses in the infant and pediatric populations. Methods: A review of a 5-year experience using a mechanical stapler to treat 64 consecutive children requiring intestinal anastomoses was performed. An intestinal stapler was used to complete a side-to-side functional end-to-end anastomosis. Postoperative outcomes and modifications made to the technique were identified. Results: Since 2004, 64 children (median age, 3 months; range, newborn to 24 months) underwent procedures requiring intestinal anastomosis. Twenty-six children (41%) were 1 week or less in age. Twenty-seven children (42%) underwent a stoma closure using a stapler. Thirty-seven children (58%) underwent bowel resection and stapled anastomosis in treating a variety of surgical disorders. Complications included wound infection (n = 2) and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). No issues suggesting anastomotic dilatation and subsequent stasis/overgrowth were identified. Conclusions: These results suggest that stapled bowel anastomosis is an effective approach applicable to a variety of surgical diseases in newborns and infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-130
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Wound Infection
Dilatation
Pathologic Constriction
Hand
Newborn Infant
Pediatrics
Population

Keywords

  • Intestinal anastomosis
  • Stapled

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Experience performing 64 consecutive stapled intestinal anastomoses in small children and infants. / Mitchell, Ian C S; Barber, Robert; Fischer, Anne C.; Schindel, David T.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 128-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitchell, Ian C S ; Barber, Robert ; Fischer, Anne C. ; Schindel, David T. / Experience performing 64 consecutive stapled intestinal anastomoses in small children and infants. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 46, No. 1. pp. 128-130.
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