External trigeminal nerve stimulation: Potential rescue treatment for acute vestibular migraine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common neurologic cause of vertigo among adults. However, there are no specifically studied or approved rescue therapies for acute VM attacks. This study describes how external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) using the Cefaly® (CEFALY Technology, Seraing, Belgium) device relieves acute VM episodes. Methods: Single-center, retrospective review of 19 patients with acute VM attacks (seen between May 2018 and June 2019) treated with 20-min eTNS. Prior to treatment, patients graded the severity of their vertigo/headache using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) with 0 representing no vertigo/headache, and 10 representing the worst imaginable vertigo/headache. After eTNS, patients graded their vertigo/headache using the same VAS 15 min. In addition, bedside neuro-otologic examination was performed before and after treatment. Results: 19/19 patients reported improvement in vertigo severity. Mean vertigo severity was 6.6 (±2.1; median 7) before eTNS, and 2.7 (±2.6; median 3) following treatment; mean improvement in vertigo was 61.3% (±32.6; median 50.0%). During VM episodes, 14/19 experienced headache. Mean headache severity was 4.8 (±2.4; median 4.5) before eTNS, and was 1.4 (±2.4; median 0) following treatment; mean improvement in headache was 77.2% (±32.7; median 100.0%). Neuro-otologic examination was normal during VM attacks in all except Patient 7 who had spontaneous upbeat nystagmus which resolved after eTNS. Other improvements include improvement of eye pressure, head pressure, and chronic facial pain. No intolerable side effects were reported. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence that eTNS is a novel, non-invasive, safe and effective treatment for acute VM attacks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116550
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume408
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2020

Fingerprint

Trigeminal Nerve
Vertigo
Migraine Disorders
Headache
Therapeutics
Visual Analog Scale
Pressure
Facial Pain
Belgium
Chronic Pain
Nervous System
Head
Technology
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • External trigeminal nerve stimulation
  • Migraine
  • Neuromodulation
  • Vertigo
  • Vestibular migraine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

@article{fec1cae111e44d3b90195a99986fe6ca,
title = "External trigeminal nerve stimulation: Potential rescue treatment for acute vestibular migraine",
abstract = "Objective: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common neurologic cause of vertigo among adults. However, there are no specifically studied or approved rescue therapies for acute VM attacks. This study describes how external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) using the Cefaly{\circledR} (CEFALY Technology, Seraing, Belgium) device relieves acute VM episodes. Methods: Single-center, retrospective review of 19 patients with acute VM attacks (seen between May 2018 and June 2019) treated with 20-min eTNS. Prior to treatment, patients graded the severity of their vertigo/headache using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) with 0 representing no vertigo/headache, and 10 representing the worst imaginable vertigo/headache. After eTNS, patients graded their vertigo/headache using the same VAS 15 min. In addition, bedside neuro-otologic examination was performed before and after treatment. Results: 19/19 patients reported improvement in vertigo severity. Mean vertigo severity was 6.6 (±2.1; median 7) before eTNS, and 2.7 (±2.6; median 3) following treatment; mean improvement in vertigo was 61.3{\%} (±32.6; median 50.0{\%}). During VM episodes, 14/19 experienced headache. Mean headache severity was 4.8 (±2.4; median 4.5) before eTNS, and was 1.4 (±2.4; median 0) following treatment; mean improvement in headache was 77.2{\%} (±32.7; median 100.0{\%}). Neuro-otologic examination was normal during VM attacks in all except Patient 7 who had spontaneous upbeat nystagmus which resolved after eTNS. Other improvements include improvement of eye pressure, head pressure, and chronic facial pain. No intolerable side effects were reported. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence that eTNS is a novel, non-invasive, safe and effective treatment for acute VM attacks.",
keywords = "External trigeminal nerve stimulation, Migraine, Neuromodulation, Vertigo, Vestibular migraine",
author = "Beh, {Shin C.}",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jns.2019.116550",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "408",
journal = "Journal of the Neurological Sciences",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - External trigeminal nerve stimulation

T2 - Potential rescue treatment for acute vestibular migraine

AU - Beh, Shin C.

PY - 2020/1/15

Y1 - 2020/1/15

N2 - Objective: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common neurologic cause of vertigo among adults. However, there are no specifically studied or approved rescue therapies for acute VM attacks. This study describes how external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) using the Cefaly® (CEFALY Technology, Seraing, Belgium) device relieves acute VM episodes. Methods: Single-center, retrospective review of 19 patients with acute VM attacks (seen between May 2018 and June 2019) treated with 20-min eTNS. Prior to treatment, patients graded the severity of their vertigo/headache using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) with 0 representing no vertigo/headache, and 10 representing the worst imaginable vertigo/headache. After eTNS, patients graded their vertigo/headache using the same VAS 15 min. In addition, bedside neuro-otologic examination was performed before and after treatment. Results: 19/19 patients reported improvement in vertigo severity. Mean vertigo severity was 6.6 (±2.1; median 7) before eTNS, and 2.7 (±2.6; median 3) following treatment; mean improvement in vertigo was 61.3% (±32.6; median 50.0%). During VM episodes, 14/19 experienced headache. Mean headache severity was 4.8 (±2.4; median 4.5) before eTNS, and was 1.4 (±2.4; median 0) following treatment; mean improvement in headache was 77.2% (±32.7; median 100.0%). Neuro-otologic examination was normal during VM attacks in all except Patient 7 who had spontaneous upbeat nystagmus which resolved after eTNS. Other improvements include improvement of eye pressure, head pressure, and chronic facial pain. No intolerable side effects were reported. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence that eTNS is a novel, non-invasive, safe and effective treatment for acute VM attacks.

AB - Objective: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common neurologic cause of vertigo among adults. However, there are no specifically studied or approved rescue therapies for acute VM attacks. This study describes how external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) using the Cefaly® (CEFALY Technology, Seraing, Belgium) device relieves acute VM episodes. Methods: Single-center, retrospective review of 19 patients with acute VM attacks (seen between May 2018 and June 2019) treated with 20-min eTNS. Prior to treatment, patients graded the severity of their vertigo/headache using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) with 0 representing no vertigo/headache, and 10 representing the worst imaginable vertigo/headache. After eTNS, patients graded their vertigo/headache using the same VAS 15 min. In addition, bedside neuro-otologic examination was performed before and after treatment. Results: 19/19 patients reported improvement in vertigo severity. Mean vertigo severity was 6.6 (±2.1; median 7) before eTNS, and 2.7 (±2.6; median 3) following treatment; mean improvement in vertigo was 61.3% (±32.6; median 50.0%). During VM episodes, 14/19 experienced headache. Mean headache severity was 4.8 (±2.4; median 4.5) before eTNS, and was 1.4 (±2.4; median 0) following treatment; mean improvement in headache was 77.2% (±32.7; median 100.0%). Neuro-otologic examination was normal during VM attacks in all except Patient 7 who had spontaneous upbeat nystagmus which resolved after eTNS. Other improvements include improvement of eye pressure, head pressure, and chronic facial pain. No intolerable side effects were reported. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence that eTNS is a novel, non-invasive, safe and effective treatment for acute VM attacks.

KW - External trigeminal nerve stimulation

KW - Migraine

KW - Neuromodulation

KW - Vertigo

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